Speaking of which, our speculative render of the next Corsa builds upon the styling langue implemented by the Rüsselsheim-based marque for the pair of crossovers, but adapted to better suit a supermini. It’s unclear at this point whether the styling direction will change now that Opel is underneath PSA’s umbrella, but it could happen considering the underpinnings are significantly being modified.
Power first came from 1.0 L 45 hp, 1.2 L 55 hp, 1.3 L 70 hp and 1.4 L 75 hp petrol engines. (The first engines were all equipped with carburetors; fuel injection came later, but never for the 1.0.) The engines were based on the well proven Family II design,[citation needed] except for the 1.0 L and early 1.2 L engines, which were based on the OHV unit from the Kadett C.
Opel has teased the arrival of its all-new supermini, the 2019 Corsa, with a single image on its social media. Captioned with "Revolutionary. Electrifying. Accessible!" on Twitter, the picture shows the car's headlight and... actually, it's just a headlight. The daytime-running light signature borrows heavily from the GT X Experimental concept, with its angular, inverted Nike 'Swoosh' design...
All of this was a product of corporate leverage and synergies and all of these corporate-sounding words that sound so much better when Jack Donaghy says them. The cynical say that the idea to badge Opels as Saabs happened a few years later with the second-generation 900, which shares a lot of pieces with the Calibra, but in reality they're very different cars. As a Saab, I say the Calibra would've been derided from the start and its reputation ruined that way. Listen to Chris Goffey and his beard go on about its styling and merits when he drove it as the Vauxhall Calibra on old Top Gear.
Looks-wise, we know from Chevrolet’s teaser photo that the Spark’s front end will differ from the Opel, but the two cars’ side surfacing and overall profile gives away the relation. We also expect the Chevrolet Spark to have a similar interior as the Opel Karl, which looks significantly more modern and upscale than the current Chevrolet Spark, at least in photos.
Opel va depune eforturi susținute pentru a asigura acuratețea și actualizarea conținutului acestei pagini de internet, dar nu își asumă răspunderea pentru niciun fel de daune sau pierderi cauzate de utilizarea informațiilor de pe pagina de internet. Anumite informații de pe această pagină de internet pot fi incorecte ca urmare a modificărilor aduse produselor de la lansarea acestora. Unele dintre echipamentele descrise sau ilustrate pot fi disponibile doar pentru anumite piețe sau la un preț suplimentar. Opel își rezervă dreptul de a schimba oricând specificațiile produselor. Pentru specificațiile actuale ale produsului comercializat în țara ta, te rugăm să contactezi dealerul Opel local.
On 29 February 2012, Opel announced the creation of a major alliance with PSA Peugeot Citroen resulting in GM taking a 7% share of PSA, becoming PSA's second-largest shareholder after the Peugeot family. The alliance was intended to enable $2 billion per year of cost savings through platform sharing, common purchasing, and other economies of scale.[25] In December 2013, GM sold its 7% interest in PSA for £250 million, after plans of cost savings were not as successful.[26] Opel was said to be among Europe's most aggressive discounters in mass-market.[27] GM reported a 2016 loss of US$257 million from its European operations.[26] It is reported that GM has lost about US$20 billion in Europe since 1999.[28]
The engine came with a choice from two power levels. For the standard 1.0 litre engine maximum output was listed as 40 PS (29 kW) at 5,000 rpm, and in October 1963 the high compression "1.0 S-Motor" was added, sharing the 993 cc capacity of the original power unit, but offering a maximum 48 PS (35 kW) of power at 5,400 rpm.[7] The more powerful "S-Motor" engine featured modifications to the inlet manifold, cylinders and camshaft along with a carburetor employing larger (36 mm (1.4 in) diameter than the 30 mm (1.2 in) used on the standard engine. This came with an 8.8: 1 compression ratio whereas the 40 PS (29 kW; 39 hp) engine used a compression ratio of only 7.8 : 1.[8] Higher compression ratios for performance versions of standard engines were a growing trend in West Germany in the 1960s, led by Opel and Ford, and made possible by the growing availability of higher octane "Super" grade fuel at filling stations.

The Kadett’s role in facilitating that is a major piece of automotive history I’ve been wanting to tell for years, but finding a Kadett in this country has been impossible, despite Opel having dumped almost half a million on our shores. It took my son’s recent trip to the old country to find one, sitting on the street in Innsbruck, no less. Maybe folks back there have a greater appreciation for Kadetts and the role they played; Americans’ fling with the Kadett was a very fleeting one, and perhaps many would just as soon forget it. Not me.

The Kadett D was introduced in the middle of August 1979, with deliveries on the home market beginning early in September 1979.[14] In November 1979, the car went on sale in the United Kingdom, some five months before the Vauxhall Astra Mark 1, the British version, was launched in April 1980. The cars were designed as three- or five-door hatchbacks and estates or station wagons. There were also two- and four-door sedans featuring separate boots/trunks, which shared the silhouettes of the hatchbacks: in the United Kingdom, the sedan versions were soon withdrawn, until the 1986 launch of the MKII-based Belmont. For the first time since 1965 there was no coupé-bodied Kadett in the range: the previous Kadett C coupé was indirectly replaced by the three-door 1.3 SR sports model.

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