Other special jobs were undertaken at the Rüsselsheim factory. One that was too exotic to be typical was the construction of an intercooler for the supercharger of the famous Junkers Jumo aircraft engine. Special methods had to be developed to fabricate this vital assembly from very thin sheets of aluminium. With work like this going on, Germany's enemies naturally took note of the various Opel plants, and starting in August 1944, began attacking them by air. Destruction was heavy at both Rüsselsheim and Brandenburg from the attacks by Allied bombers. Never was the outlook bleaker at Adam Opel AG than in the first months of 1945.
In marketing terms the "Kadett KJ38" was intended to fill the niche that Opel had recently vacated with the departure of the Opel P4, but the KJ38, priced at 1,800 Marks, was more expensive than the P4 and its reduced specification left it with the image of a car for poor people (..Image des Arme-Leute-Autos..) at a time when economic growth in Germany was finally fostering a less minimalist approach to car buying.[4] The "Kadett K38 Spezial" fared better in the market place: in 1938 and again in 1939 it was Germany's top selling small car. By May 1941 the company had produced 17,871 "Kadett KJ38"s and 56,335 "Kadett K38 Spezial"s.[4]

As it turned out, the Opels were still lacking in this department. Manuel Reuter was fastest of the two with 5th on the grid, while Keke Rosberg clocked a disappointing 9th time. Both managed to be slower than several of the lesser Mercedes. Both races left much to be desired as well, with Rosberg finishing 7th in Race 1. Reuter retired with electronic gremlins after just 6 laps, and was forced to miss Race 2. Rosberg was felled by similar issues in Race 2, and slowed after 10 laps.
The 75 PS (55 kW) 1.3 CDTI engine was updated in the middle of 2007 to bring CO2 levels to just 119 g/km, meaning that twelve months' Vehicle Excise Duty in the United Kingdom costs £30 and is eligible for the Plan 2000E (a rebate of €2000 in the purchase of a new car) in Spain.[41] The car is also used as the villain car in Lights, Motors, Action! Extreme Stunt Show at Disney's Hollywood Studios.
You can get a basic Crossland (which is actually very well equipped, complete with OnStar and a wifi hotspot) for just €21,995 in SC trim. However, our test car, an SE, was bumped up from a €26,495 base price to more than €28,000 with a few optional extras. And that’s a big tripwire. For that same money, I could have bought an Astra Sport Tourer estate, with the excellent 1.4 Turbo petrol engine, in range-topping Elite trim, with a bigger boot and more space in the back seats. And a chassis that sparkles and delights, rather than merely trudges along. The Crossland X is a significant car for Opel, not least because it is the first fruits of that Franco-German tying of the knot, but it’s rather lacklustre in comparison to the excellence of the Astra.

Compared with the Opel Mokka X, which comes with optional four-wheel drive for occasional off-road outings, the new Opel Crossland X is predestined for urban areas with compact exterior dimensions while also being perfectly suitable for a shopping spree at the organic farm shop or for a holiday trip to Tuscany. With a length of 4.21 meters, the new Crossland X is 16 centimeters shorter than an Astra while at the same time 10 centimeters higher. Occupants enjoy an elevated seating position and the excellent all-round view it provides. Buyers looking for an even better experience can further improve the feeling of space with the optional panoramic glass roof.
The Corsa A was known in the United Kingdom market as the Vauxhall Nova (as it was considered that Corsa sounded too much like "coarser"), where it was launched in April 1983, following a seven month long union dispute due to British workers being angry about the car not being built there[6] whilst British built cars were subject to huge import tariffs in Spain prior to its entry into the European Community.[citation needed]
In Australia, the car was launched to much fanfare from many motor journalists, and went on to win the Wheels 2001 "Car of the Year" (COTY). Holden also imported the SRi version with the 1.8L Astra motor and uprated sports suspension including traction control, ABS brakes, a better tyre/wheel combination and Irmscher body kit to produce a "baby hot hatch" Barina.

The Carnection thing was only part of Behlmann’s problems. The fact that no one was buying full-size conversion vans anymore surely couldn’t have helped. Behlmann was by far the biggest dealer in the country for those things. The ’90s SUV craze was a little slower to take hold in STL because Behlmann’s volume allowed them to sell big conversion vans for not much more than a loaded up SUV. Those vans were EVERYWHERE!
In Australia, the car was launched to much fanfare from many motor journalists, and went on to win the Wheels 2001 "Car of the Year" (COTY). Holden also imported the SRi version with the 1.8L Astra motor and uprated sports suspension including traction control, ABS brakes, a better tyre/wheel combination and Irmscher body kit to produce a "baby hot hatch" Barina.
Meanwhile, the Crossland X and the Opel Mokka X have similar dimensions. While the Mokka X is a thoroughbred crossover with optional all-wheel-drive, the Crossland X is available exclusively in front-wheel-drive, making it less capable offroad. As such, the Crossland X can be best described as a crossover-like MPV. As Opel puts it, the vehicle is “predestined for urban areas with its crisp exterior dimensions while also being perfectly suitable for a shopping spree at the organic farm shop or for a holiday trip to Tuscany.”
Power will come exclusively from a three-cylinder 1.0-liter naturally aspirated gasoline engine developing 75 HP (55 kW) delivered to the front wheels through a five-speed manual gearbox. Opel and Vauxhall say the chassis has been tweaked to provide "exceptional safety and comfort" and both cars come with traction control, hill start assist and electronic stability control.
Under the hood, the ROCKS shares the 1.0-liter, three cylinder gasoline engine (NEDC fuel consumption: urban 5.6-5.2 l/100 km, extra-urban 4.2-4.0 l/100 km, combined 4.7-4.4 l/100 km; 106-101 g/km CO2) of its KARL sibling The unit delivers 55 kW/75 hp and is paired to a five-speed manual gearbox as standard. Alternatively, KARL ROCKS buyers can choose the optional Easytronic® 3.0 gearbox. The five-speed automated transmission combines the comfort advantages of an automatic transmission with the efficiency of a manual gearbox. It automatically selects the appropriate gear for best possible fuel consumption, but is based on a manual transmission optimized for smaller engines which enables ultra-economical driving. The driver can take manual control of Easytronic 3.0 at any time by pulling or pushing the gear selector lever.
The 5-door Corsa was essentially the same car as the 3-door version with little differences to tell the two apart, except the extra set of doors, of course. Powered by an almost identical range of engines, the 5-door Corsas had a large wheelbase which lead to a trunk volume increase from 9.2 (for the 3-door) to 10 cubic feet. The GSi was not a level equipment to be found among the engine-milder ...
My Familys first car in the US was a used 1959 Opel Rekord – I dont remember that one much but when I was 4 we got a powder blue Kadett Wagon – My mother a Berliner loved Opels – 1978-79 my Sister inherited the car as her first car and then I got it as a hand me down again in 1981 – when I first got it it had never been driven over 50 MPH so I was a bit of a shock to the poor car – but even back then it got amazing gas mileage. That is until we took it to a mechanic for a tune up and he had apparently wasn’t good with european makes – he went to adjust the carburetor and some spring loaded valve shot out and we couldnt find parts anywhere by that time. gas mileage dropped massively and running poorly the car died while crossing on the side of a field on a farm. The family there adopted it as a bit of a fort – clubhouse for a few years as we chose to buy another car when I graduated – I miss the simplicity of the car – of course I remember it fondly by I’m betting the reality of it would be a shock!
(first posted 3/9/2012)      For those under a certain age, the name Opel Kadett may be as familiar as Richard Speck, The Troggs, or Valley of the Dolls. Yes, 1966 was a long time ago, but that’s when the second generation of Opel’s VW fighter appeared and knocked down the long-time king of the small car hill. VW should thank Opel for that thumping; it really needed the wake up call that resulted in a new world order, spelled: G-O-L-F.
The Latin American Corsa received a small facelift in 1999, with smoother bumpers, and from April 2002 (when the new Corsa II was introduced) the Corsa B began being marketed as the "Corsa Classic"[27] until 2010, where it became the "Classic" when the Corsa B derived Chevrolet Sail and Chevrolet Celta replaced it. Production finally ceased in October 2016.[28]

By 1970, the Kadett’s brief stay in the US import car rank number two was over, having been muscled aside by Toyota’s hot new redesigned Corolla (CC here). The Corolla was very much a car in the Kadett’s formula: traditional rwd and conventional in every respect. But the combination of a high D-Mark, and Toyota’s hot momentum changed the tide forever. In the US, the Corolla would soon enough depose VW out of the top slot. In Germany, the Beetles rapid crash and the Kadett’s success forced VW’s hand with the very advanced Golf, recouping the gold. The Kadett/Astra were the perennial number two in germany, but some years ago, it dropped further down the the top seller list, as smaller cars, including Opel’s Corsa have become more popular. But the Golf still sits on the throne.
Rüsselsheim.  The eagerly-awaited new Opel Corsa GSi has arrived! After the Insignia, the Corsa is the second GSi model now on offer. The newcomer impresses with its ultra-precise OPC chassis – for exemplary handling and short braking distances. The Corsa GSi is powered by Opel’s lively 1.4-liter turbo with 110 kW/150 hp and 220 Nm of torque (fuel consumption[1] l/100 km: 8.0-7.7 urban, 5.5-5.1 extra-urban, 6.4-6.0 combined, CO2 g/km 147-138 combined). The four-cylinder power unit features a special GSi-calibration for increased responsiveness. Mated to a short-ratio, six-speed gearbox, the engine delivers outstanding punch in second and third gears, as well as a maximum torque plateau from 3,000 to 4,500 rpm.
The 1.0 L and 1.2 L Ecotec Family 0 engines are carry overs from the Corsa B; the 1.4 L Family 1 engine was replaced with a new 1.4 L Family 0 model. The 1.8 L Family 1 engine is an upgrade for the previous 1.6 L 16 valve engine and produces 125 PS (92 kW) and 165 N⋅m (122 lb⋅ft) of torque. The edition with the 1.8 L engine was named Corsa GSi and was the predecessor of the new Corsa OPC.
×