¹Opțional. Funcționează automat între 5 km/h și 85 km/h. Între 5 și 30 km/h, decelerarea pentru reducerea vitezei de impact este de 0,9 g. Într 30 și 85 km/h, sistemul reduce viteza cu maxim 22 km/h. După acest prag, șoferul trebuie să frâneze singur pentru a reduce și mai mult viteza. Gama de viteze de funcționare a AEBPD depinde de obstacolul detectat (mobil: între 5 și 85 km/h; fix: între 5 și 80 km/h; pietoni: între 5 și 60 km/h). Sistemele Opel de asistență pentru șofer au rolul de a asista șoferul în cadrul limitărilor imanente ale sistemului. Șoferul rămâne responsabil pentru sarcinile conducerii. Se preconizează că va fi disponibil din toamna anului 2017.


Last week when I was looking at 90s coupes, I came across one that Americans never had the chance to get – the Opel Calibra. A successor to the Opel Manta that Americans once got through Buick dealerships, I began to realize it was a shame we never got to have this. Weirder, considering it shares a lot of underneath pieces with the second-generation Saab 900.
World War II brought to Rüsselsheim the only year in the history of Opel – 1945 – in which it produced fewer vehicles since that first Lutzmann-authored Opel was made in 1899. Before the conflict broke out, the Adam Opel AG had established itself as the largest motor vehicle manufacturer in Europe. The combination of Opel know-how with GM resources had produced outstanding results. In spite of stifling red tape, the economic atmosphere in Germany in the 1930s had powerfully fertilised the growth of this and other auto companies, but in the case of Opel, at least, the expansion of this industrial machine clearly was not directed in any way toward military objectives.

I join in the question: “Where did they all go?” These were pretty common in the upper midwest (as imports went) in the late 60s-mid 70s. I knew a Lutheran minister who owned one (maybe a 69 or so?) in the mid 70s, and got to ride in it once. He seemed pretty proud of the fact that he had put about 80K on it and it seemed to be running strongly. Although it was starting to look a little worn, it seemed to hold up a lot better than my Scoutmaster’s 69 Cortina.
Production started on December 4, 1946. The Moskvitch 400/420 continued to be made in Moscow with some minor changes until 1956, when it was replaced by the Moskvitch 402. The latter was an all-new design apart from the engine, for which Moskvitch continued to use the Kadett side-valve engine until 1958, when it was replaced with a domestically designed OHV engine.[7]
Intelligent lightweight design begins on the computer, using the newest virtual development methods. The specific use of various steel grades and connection methods enabled the Corsa’s big weight reduction. This includes the consistent use of high-strength and ultra-high-strength steels, as well as the optimization of load paths, connections, structure and form. Compared with the previous model, the body-in-white is 40kg lighter. The next Corsa is based on the multi-energy platform for small and compact cars, which allows a variety of propulsion systems. Customers can choose from combustion engines or the all-electric version.
^ Jump up to: a b c Note: The powertrain plant Opel Wien GmbH in Aspern/Vienna (Austria) is not a subsidiary of Adam Opel AG but a first-tier subsidiary of General Motors Europe Limited (GME) (99.5%) and of GM AUTOMOTIVE UK (GMAUK) (0.5%), see "Opel Wien GmbH, FN 110500a". FirmenABC Marketing GmbH. Retrieved 3 April 2017. Both, GME and GMAUK, are located in Luton. GME Ltd. itself is a daughter company of GM CME Holdings CV, which is directly controlled by the General Motors Corporation (GMC), see "Name: GENERAL MOTORS EUROPE LIMITED, Company Number: 07556915". Company search, Made Simple Group Ltd. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
In March 2017, Groupe PSA agreed to buy Opel, its British sister brand Vauxhall and their European auto lending business from General Motors for US$2.2 billion.[32][33] In return, General Motors will pay PSA US$3.2 billion for future European pension obligations and keep managing US$9.8 billion worth of plans for existing retirees. Furthermore, GM is responsible for paying about US$400 million annually for 15 years to fund the existing Great Britain and Germany pension plans.[32]
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