With a boot capacity of 410 litres the Crossland X with its SUV-styling provides one of the largest load capacities in its class - it can even be expanded to 1,255 litres. The Versatility Pack1  makes Crossland X even more flexible; the rear seats can be moved backwards and forwards whilst the backrest is adjustable and offers a 40/20/40 split-folding arrangement. The load area also features a height adjustable load floor.
Things are a little better up front, where we find driver and passenger seats approved by the Aktion Gesunder Rucken, or German Bad Back Association. They are truly, properly comfortable, and even long journeys fail to induce numb-bum, nor thigh-tremble. It does go a bit downhill from there though. The fascia and instrument panel are pulled, more or less directly, from the Corsa hatch, which means everything’s reasonably well made, but a bit dour and glum in appearance. That contrasts sharply to the quirkier, more welcoming interiors of the Crossland’s French cousins. There are good things – the seven-inch IntelliLink touchscreen is clear and good to use, albeit it has a slightly messy menu system, but the main dials look drab, and items such as the column stalks actually feel quite fragile and cheap.
The new Kadett follaed the innovative Opel Olympia in adoptin a chassis-less monocoque construction, suggestin that lik the Vauxhall 10 introduced in 1937 bi Opel's Inglis sister-company, the Opel Kadett wis designed for hie volume law cost production. Competitive pricin led tae commercial success, an Kadetts continued tae be produced durin the early months o the war: bi the time production wis interruptit in 1940 follaein intensification o hostilities, 107,608 o thir Opel Kadetts haed come aff the assembly line at Opel's Rüsselsheim plant, which haed been the first major caur plant in Germany tae apply the assembly-line production techniques pioneered bi Henry Ford.
Just a year later, a new Soviet car, the Moskvitch 400, rolled off a Moscow assembly line. It seemed to be the Opel Kadett in every detail, with only the name changed (various sources provide contradictory information; see the respective article). By late 1950, the Russians were exporting these Kremlin Kadetts to Belgium, stressing in their promotion that spare parts could easily be obtained from Germany. A Moskvitch model that bore no trace of Opel engineering was not introduced until 1959, and by that time, Opel was just about ready to introduce a new Kadett of its own.
Being at the core of Opel’s design philosophy, sculptural design with a clear sense of precision also plays a major part in the interior design. Instrument panel and center stack are clearly structured and horizontally aligned to the driver. As the driver control center, the cockpit enhances the active driving feeling. An extensive engine portfolio ranging from gasoline to diesel and LPG that can be mated to manual and automatic transmissions is available to ensure good driving performance.
The extra-light, all-aluminium engines, together with optimization of the front and rear axles, also contribute to the low total weight. The particularly compact three-cylinder petrol engines weigh around 15kg less than the previous generation of similarly powerful four-cylinder units. Highly unusual in the small-car-sector is the new Corsa’s aluminium engine bonnet, which although longer, saves 2.4kg in comparison to the previous model’s bonnet made of steel. The Insignia flagship was previously the only model in the Opel range with an aluminium bonnet. The seats also have been put on a diet. The new optimized seat structure saves a total of 10kg – 5.5kg at the front, 4.5kg at the rear. New lighter insulating material was used for fine tuning. Altogether the measures result in a weight reduction that, in combination with optimum aerodynamics and the efficient powertrains, will lead to a considerable reduction in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.
On the British motoring show Top Gear, Richard Hammond drove a 1963 Kadett A through the middle of Botswana and across the Makgadikgadi Salt Pan. He loved the car so much that he named it Oliver and later had the car shipped to the United Kingdom and restored, and it remains in his possession. It appeared on Richard Hammond's Blast Lab with the personalised number plate 'OL1 V3R'. It also appeared in the Top Gear lorry challenge as one of the used obstacles.[9]
When I was 16 or 17, some friens and I used to buy old cars from the junkyard to drive it to pieces in the woods. Most cars did not last very long, as we tortured them with smashing them trough rough terrain, rolling over many times and held races through soft sands. Until we got an Opel Kadett. It gave us rally pleasure for weeks and weeks. Until one day, the orange oil pressure light went on.
Rüsselsheim/Veneto.  Crisp and compact on the outside, very spacious and versatile on the inside with trendy two-tone paintwork and cool SUV look – that is the all-new Opel Crossland X. Following its premiere at the beginning of February, this versatile urban crossover model is the second member of the Opel X family in the B-segment where it joins the sporty bestseller, the Mokka X. The third member, the larger Grandland X, will be launched in the compact class (C-segment) later this year.

GM retains an engineering centre at Millbrook in the UK and is no stranger to tuning cars there, because it knows that British road conditions are different from those elsewhere. So whereas Opel Corsas, belying their German engineering origin, will apparently have greater straight-on stability to their steering, UK cars get a different power steering tune (electric assistance makes that much easier).
In the early 1990s, South African Kadett GSi's were further upgraded based on their success in production car racing and initially 500 special units were built as road cars for homologation purposes. This was a minimum requirement for entry into the Stannic Group N races. They went against BMW's 325iS (A 2.7 litre homologation special from BMW). They featured more aggressive 276-degree camshafts made by Schrick with 2 different settings for timing overlap (110° and 107°), revised intake and exhaust modifications (4-in-1 branch manifold and freeflow exhaust), Irmscher spring kit, modified engine management system by Promotec, a limited slip differential developed by Andre Verwey and special Aluett 7Jx15-inch ET35 alloy wheels, they were nicknamed the "Superboss"[29] and held the world record for the most torque per litre (114 Nm per litre) for a naturally aspirated car until 2009 being beaten by the Ferrari 458 (117 Nm per litre). After the first 500 units were produced, many more were built to satisfy public demand.
The Kadett E (Vauxhall Astra Mark 2 in the United Kingdom) was introduced in August 1984, and was voted the 1985 European Car of the Year.[21][22] The 1984 model was also developed into a more conventional three-box design with a boot (trunk), badged as the Vauxhall Belmont in the United Kingdom, launched at Frankfurt 1985. This was awarded the 1985 Semperit Irish Car of the Year in Ireland. There was a station wagon called the "Caravan" available, with either three or five doors. In South Africa, the Kadett notchback was sold as the Opel Monza, along with a convertible.[23] This replaced the Opel Ascona.[24]
The standard equipment of the Corsa special model positioned above the “Edition” variant includes assistance systems such as rear Park Pilot and Cruise Control. Comfort is increased with features like heated seats, heated steering and velour carpets. In addition to attractive prices, the “120 Years” models also feature light-alloy wheels and stylish chrome details, as well as “OPEL” and the “120 Years” logo on the door sills. Prices for the Opel Corsa “120 Years” in Germany begin at €15,440 including VAT (Corsa 1.2 with 51 kW/70 hp and five-speed manual transmission: fuel consumption1, 2 : urban 7.4-7.3 l/100 km, extra-urban 5.0-4.9 l/100 km, combined 5.9-5.8 l/100 km, 134-132 g/km CO2) –  with additional equipment packs the price advantage can reach as much as €2,540.00 3.

My father, who could well be this man  (except for the Germanic house behind it), bought a new sickly-green Kadett A just like this in 1965, at the local Buick dealer in Towson. So, yes; I can speak for the Kadett’s ability to trounce all VWs in street-light races, thanks to my older brother’s repeated VW-baiting. And at seventy or so, the turbulence from the boxy body caused the tops of the thin little doors to actually move away from the body enough to see daylight between them. Lightweight construction indeed.  Hopefully, someday I’ll miraculously find a Kadett A and do the full story of its colorful place in history, both the automotive world’s as well as the Niedermeyer’s. But this CC is about its successor.

Just a year later, a new Soviet car, the Moskvitch 400, rolled off a Moscow assembly line. It seemed to be the Opel Kadett in every detail, with only the name changed (various sources provide contradictory information; see the respective article). By late 1950, the Russians were exporting these Kremlin Kadetts to Belgium, stressing in their promotion that spare parts could easily be obtained from Germany. A Moskvitch model that bore no trace of Opel engineering was not introduced until 1959, and by that time, Opel was just about ready to introduce a new Kadett of its own.
Peugeot and Citroën are working with China’s Dongfeng Motor on a brand new Common Modular Platform (also known as EMP1) tailored to small cars and it will be put to good use in the next Corsa. As a matter of fact, the French group has already announced the 2019 Corsa will use hardware from PSA, so don’t be too surprised if it will inherit a significant amount of components from the new 208.

You can get a basic Crossland (which is actually very well equipped, complete with OnStar and a wifi hotspot) for just €21,995 in SC trim. However, our test car, an SE, was bumped up from a €26,495 base price to more than €28,000 with a few optional extras. And that’s a big tripwire. For that same money, I could have bought an Astra Sport Tourer estate, with the excellent 1.4 Turbo petrol engine, in range-topping Elite trim, with a bigger boot and more space in the back seats. And a chassis that sparkles and delights, rather than merely trudges along. The Crossland X is a significant car for Opel, not least because it is the first fruits of that Franco-German tying of the knot, but it’s rather lacklustre in comparison to the excellence of the Astra.
All of this was a product of corporate leverage and synergies and all of these corporate-sounding words that sound so much better when Jack Donaghy says them. The cynical say that the idea to badge Opels as Saabs happened a few years later with the second-generation 900, which shares a lot of pieces with the Calibra, but in reality they're very different cars. As a Saab, I say the Calibra would've been derided from the start and its reputation ruined that way. Listen to Chris Goffey and his beard go on about its styling and merits when he drove it as the Vauxhall Calibra on old Top Gear.

At the first round of the season held at the former Grand Prix track of Zolder in Belgium, Opel Team Joest’s misfortunes continued. Manuel Reuter retired in the early stages, with both John Winter (16th) and Keke Rosberg finishing a lap down on winner Alessandro Nannini (ITA) in the Alfa. Race 2 was more positive however, with only John Winter dropping early on. Reuter lead the Opel charge in 7th, with Rosberg in 10th.
In 1924, the Rüsselsheim-based company went even further to cater to the “average consumer” – also thanks to an automotive innovation. After all, from the very first minute Opel was committed to producing cars as efficiently as possible and thus making them affordable for a broad customer base. Consequently, the 4/12 hp heralded the start of assembly line production in Germany. And because the 60 km/h fast car was only available “in a quiet green that pleases the eye” to keep the time and effort required for production at a minimum, everyone called it the “Tree Frog”. Soon, 25 two-seater “cars for everyone” left the assembly line every day. In the following years an entire vehicle family was built on the Tree Frog technology. The smoother production ran, the greater the cost advantage that Opel passed on to its customers. Unbelievable but true: the purchase price of the 4 hp model series, of which 119,484 units were produced, was almost 40 per cent lower in 1931 than at the launch of the Tree Frog model.
Last week when I was looking at 90s coupes, I came across one that Americans never had the chance to get – the Opel Calibra. A successor to the Opel Manta that Americans once got through Buick dealerships, I began to realize it was a shame we never got to have this. Weirder, considering it shares a lot of underneath pieces with the second-generation Saab 900.
As an Opel, it could've been a great rival for the Ford Probe, Mitsubishi Eclipse, Toyota Celica and all of the handsome sport coupes that popped up in the early '90s. You could get a Calibra with an all-wheel drive system, or a turbocharged engine (not from Saab), or a 2.5-liter V6 (shared with Saab). It had a hatchback for practicality. Versions with big wheels look rather handsome, too. Had it been priced like a Saab, though, it would've attracted too many comparisons with the E30 and E36 coupes from BMW at the time, and that probably wouldn't have ended well.
The Crossland X is actually built on an updated version of the Peugeot 2008’s underpinnings and has Peugeot-Citroen-DS engines. It’s a joint-venture with the French company, and the other half of that venture is the Citroen C3 Aircross, due a month or two later. The C3 Aircross, just like the Crossland X, is a pseudo-crossover designed to replace an MPV – in that case the C3 Picasso.
The Opel Kadett B was sold from 1966 to 1973, with two- and four-door versions (including notchback and, from 1967, fastback form), a three-door wagon, and two coupés (regular and fastback). There was also a competitive Opel Kadett Rallye, with a 1.9 liter engine. The Kadett B was sold in the United States through Buick dealers from 1967 through 1972. Kadetts were technically simple cars whose task was to compete with the market leader, the VW Beetle. Schuco is a legendary German toy manufacturer, founded in 1912. The company achieved worldwide fame with its toy cars manufactured in the '30s, '40s and '50s, many of which were patented. While Schuco continues to issue a limited number of metal retro-toys for collectors, today the company is better known for its amazing diecast vehicle replicas. Working directly with manufacturers and car collectors, Schuco painstakingly re-creates each vehicle in miniature, often incorporating tiny details only visible with a magnifying glass. Most Schuco models are issued in specified limited quantities, and once gone, will not be made again. That’s why wise collectors know that a Schuco model isn’t just a purchase: It’s an investment with a lifetime return of enjoyment.
The care taken over the detailed design of the new engine was rewarded with a power unit which earned widespread respect in the industry and, at least with the Kadett A, tended to outlive the rest of the car in which it was fitted. In later incarnations both the 1.0 litre unit and an enlarged 1.2 litre version were still used in small Opels, including the first Opel Corsa (and Vauxhall Nova) well into the 1990s.
Vega appears to have been the first GM vehicle designed by committee – the corporate engineering staff – and imposed upon one of its divisions like a turd to be polished. Chevrolet engineering had in fact developed its own subcompact but when presented to corporate it was rejected “out of hand” by Ed Cole, who told them to develop Vega instead, then code-named “XP-887”.
Intelligent lightweight design begins on the computer, using the newest virtual development methods. The specific use of various steel grades and connection methods enabled the Corsa’s big weight reduction. This includes the consistent use of high-strength and ultra-high-strength steels, as well as the optimization of load paths, connections, structure and form. Compared with the previous model, the body-in-white is 40kg lighter. The next Corsa is based on the multi-energy platform for small and compact cars, which allows a variety of propulsion systems. Customers can choose from combustion engines or the all-electric version.
In 2012, Opel announced the closure of the Bochum plant (now known as Plant Bochum II), effective 2016, with the loss of approximately 3,000 jobs, in response to the manufacturer's longstanding over capacity and loss of market share in key western European markets.[3][4] Ellesmere Port in England became Opel's lead plant for the Astra/Kadett platform for subsequent generations.

The 1.0 L and 1.2 L Ecotec Family 0 engines are carry overs from the Corsa B; the 1.4 L Family 1 engine was replaced with a new 1.4 L Family 0 model. The 1.8 L Family 1 engine is an upgrade for the previous 1.6 L 16 valve engine and produces 125 PS (92 kW) and 165 N⋅m (122 lb⋅ft) of torque. The edition with the 1.8 L engine was named Corsa GSi and was the predecessor of the new Corsa OPC.
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