The Rally’s 1100 cc SR engine was hardly a drag-strip terror: the little 1100cc buzz-bomb got higher compression and a second carburetor, as well as possibly some other changes. The result was 67 gross/60 DIN-net hp. And what little torque there was, now moved even higher into the rpm range. I can hear their raspy and nervous exhaust in my ears still, as common as they were now in the Towson area. Undoubtedly, they improved on the regular Kadett’s 21 second 0-60 dash by maybe a couple of seconds. But they looked good doing it, as well as sounding good.
The remains of Ackerman Buick in beautiful Ferguson MO were finally bulldozed recently…I think they sold Hyundai or Kia out of that building most recently. I can’t say that I’ve seen an Opel of any description, in the flesh, in several decades, with the exception of an occasional Opel GT. I was a car freak as a kid, and I’m not convinced that I’ve ever seen any of the ones featured in this post…
CROSSLAND X 1.2N M/TFrom R 294,638​Enquire NowDownload SpecificationsThe 1.2 MT has standard features such as:​15˝ steel wheel with hubcapsCruise control with speed limiterPower windows front & rear with auto up and down functionAutomatic headlight control (auto light switch)Outside rear-view mirrors: powered and heated , body colour , manual foldingRadio R 4.0: IntelliLink 7˝ Infotainment System ,USB, Bluetooth®Polyurethane steering wheel: multifunction ,cruise control and speed limiter controls​Front seats: driver: 4-way manually adjustable ,co-driver: 2-way manually adjustable2nd-row seats: 40/60 split foldable benchManual air-conditioningDriver and co-driver airbags: front airbags ,side airbags front and roof rear side airbagsFront and rear disc brakesSeat belt warning indicatorAdaptive brake light​
Just a year later, a new Soviet car, the Moskvitch 400, rolled off a Moscow assembly line. It seemed to be the Opel Kadett in every detail, with only the name changed (various sources provide contradictory information; see the respective article). By late 1950, the Russians were exporting these Kremlin Kadetts to Belgium, stressing in their promotion that spare parts could easily be obtained from Germany. A Moskvitch model that bore no trace of Opel engineering was not introduced until 1959, and by that time, Opel was just about ready to introduce a new Kadett of its own.

The GSi's engine mapping had been carried out by Opel tuning specialists Irmscher. A model with the 82 PS (60 kW) 1.4 L multi point fuel injected engine, which was otherwise mechanically identical to the GSi, also became available as the Nova SRi in the United Kingdom. In January 1988, a turbocharged version of the Isuzu diesel engine was introduced, with power increased to 67 PS (49 kW).[8]

×