On August 26, 1945, the State Defense Committee published Order № 9905, which prescribed the start of production of the 4-door Kadett on the Moscow small car plant "without any changes to the design". But implementation of the plan was far from smooth. The Rüsselsheim plant had been deeply involved in the Nazi war effort, producing aircraft engines for the Luftwaffe, and consequently has been heavily damaged by the Allied air raids. Very little was left to be salvaged – mostly incoherent drawings and plans, with several stamping dies for the 2-door version of the Kadett to add.[7]


This new category, Group A, featured very stringent homologation requirements. In order to qualify for competition, the competing model needed to be produced at least 25,000 times. Furthermore, the FIA required ten percent of these cars to be a specialty model, with another 500 allowed as “Evolution” models. If the 25,000 car limit had not yet been met, the new model had to attain a production number of at least 5000 units a year.
Not only was the body a bit bigger, but the Kadett B also had a slightly enlarged 1100 cc engine. This was externally a very compact motor indeed, and looked rather lost in the Kadett’s Kavernous engine bay. Power output increased correspondingly; there were 45 and 55 DIN hp (high compression) versions for Europe; the weaker on was sent stateside with a 54 (gross) hp rating.
The facelifted 2004 model was also imported, however, in December 2005, the Corsa C was dropped from the Australian and New Zealand Holden ranges as a cost cutting measure by GM, and was replaced by the Daewoo Kalos, rebadged as a Holden Barina. Motoring journalists were scathing in their criticism of the new model, particularly the bland handling, lackluster engine and below par safety features. The Kalos-based Barina was subsequently replaced with a rebadged version of the Chevrolet Sonic.
After the closure of Opel Australia, Holden imports newer Opel models such as the Astra GTC (ceased 1 May 2017), Astra VXR (Astra OPC), Cascada (ceased 1 May 2017), and Insignia VXR (Insignia OPC, ceased 1 May 2017), under the Holden badge.[64] The 2018 5th-gen Holden Commodore ZB is a badge-engineered Opel Insignia, replacing the Australian-made, rear-wheel drive Commodore with the German-made front-wheel/all-wheel drive Insignia platform.
A mark of General Motors' confidence in their plans for the small car sector, and something that the Opel Kadett and the Vauxhall Viva had in common, was that the manufacturer built for each new model a completely new car plant in a region characterized by relatively high unemployment and the availability of a skilled workforce, but with no strong tradition of volume auto-making. The Vauxhall Viva was the first car built at Vauxhall's Ellesmere Port plant while the Kadett A was the first product of Opel's new purpose built Bochum plant.[1] Ellesmere Port and Bochum would effectively become sister plants, producing subsequent generations of Kadett as well as their Vauxhall badged sisters (the Chevette and Astra) for the next fifty years.

Rüsselsheim.  The sixth-generation Opel Corsa is based on a completely new design, which is the basis for an increase in efficiency. The Corsa will celebrate its premiere before the end of this year. Whether diesel, petrol or – for the first time – electrically powered, every new Corsa benefits from the lower weight: the driving dynamics improve, the fuel consumption falls. The lightest version of the next generation even undercuts the magical 1,000-kilogramme mark – excluding driver, the five-door will weigh only 980kg. Compared with its predecessor, this model variant is a useful 108kg lighter. This is a weight-saving of around 10 per cent, although the new model has a similar length of 4.06 metres. Reducing so much weight while retaining similar dimensions is a remarkable development achievement that directly benefits the customer.

like the dealerships advertised,a stock vr ss 5.0 v8 will smoke it,does the 0-100k sprint in 6.0 seconds flat(standard engine+ecu parameters),oddly enough the dealerships rated the v8 as a 7 sec 0-100k car,it was over 22k au cheaper than the calibra,back in 95,obviously a marketing conn from the dealerships,thats not to say that the calibra can turn into a real beast with a phase 1-2-3 kit,
Many Opel models or models based on Opel architectures have been sold in Australia and New Zealand under the Holden marque, such as the Holden Barina (1994-2005), which were rebadged versions of the Opel Corsa, the Holden Astra. a version of the Opel Astra, and the Captiva 5, a version of the Opel Antara. In New Zealand, the Opel Kadett and Ascona were sold as niche models by General Motors New Zealand in the 1980s, while the Opel brand was used on the Opel Vectra until 1994.
The manufacturer now offered two versions of the Kadett, designated the "Kadett KJ38 and the "Kadett K38" the latter also being sold as the "Kadett Spezial". Mechanically and in terms of published performance there was little to differentiate the two, but the "Spezial" had a chrome stripe below the window line, and extra external body trim in other areas such as on the front grill. The interior of the "Spezial" was also better equipped. To the extent that the 300 Mark saving for buyers of the car reflected reduced production costs, the major difference was that the more basic "KJ38" lost the synchromous springing with which the car had been launched, and which continued to be fitted on the "Spezial". The base car instead reverted to traditional rigid axle based suspension similar to that fitted on the old Opel P4.
Everlasting Design Car Which Requires Lots Of Care — A very beautiful car from the 90's. I was very happy when was able to buy a Calibra. There are a lot of raunchy, broken-down-looking Calibras running outside, so preserving it's condition is rather hard. I love this car, it has great performance, easy and fun to drive, it gives much pleasure. It's interior is not so good looking, but overall handling is easy. Great sportscar. Once you fell in love, you won't change your mind. I'll never sell it.
There were two Opel-franchised assembly plants in Ireland in the 1960s. One in Ringsend, Dublin, was operated by Reg Armstrong Motors, which also assembled NSU cars and motorcycles. The second assembly plant was based in Cork and operated by O'Shea's, which also assembled Škoda cars and Zetor tractors.The models assembled were the Kadett and the Rekord. From 1966, the Admiral was imported as a fully built unit and became a popular seller.
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