This Corsa was a huge success for Vauxhall in Britain, being the most popular supermini and second most popular car overall in 2002, 2003 and 2004. It was also Britain's best selling supermini in 2005, achieving third place overall, but in 2006 (the final year of production) it lost top place in the supermini sector after five years, and was overtaken by the Ford Fiesta. Overall, it was Britain's fourth most popular car in 2006.
Available as standard-version or 180° panorama, the rear view camera helps you with optimal visibility all round, bird's-eye view and zoom function. What used to be invisible hazards like approaching objects from the side or crossing rear traffic, driving off becomes so much easier and safer. The zoom turns on automatically if objects are closer than 70 centimetres.
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The Kadett E has been seen as a grey import in the United Kingdom, but it is quite rare compared to its badge engineered sister, the Vauxhall Astra Mk II. It was never officially sold in Britain, and by 1989, General Motors was only marketing the Vauxhall brand in the United Kingdom, although Astras assembled at Vauxhall's Ellesmere Port plant were exported to the rest of Europe badged as Opel Kadetts. There was also a van version with a raised roof, called the Opel Kadett Combo.
World War II brought to Rüsselsheim the only year in the history of Opel – 1945 – in which it produced fewer vehicles since that first Lutzmann-authored Opel was made in 1899. Before the conflict broke out, the Adam Opel AG had established itself as the largest motor vehicle manufacturer in Europe. The combination of Opel know-how with GM resources had produced outstanding results. In spite of stifling red tape, the economic atmosphere in Germany in the 1930s had powerfully fertilised the growth of this and other auto companies, but in the case of Opel, at least, the expansion of this industrial machine clearly was not directed in any way toward military objectives.
We’ll come back to that in a minute, but first – what is a Crossland X and why is it here? It’s actually Opel’s new small crossover, and also a replacement for the old Meriva MPV, and it shares a chassis and some major mechanical bits with the Peugeot 2008 and Citroen C3 Aircross. Ah, so you’ll assume, this must be the first fruits of the much-bandied-about buyout of Opel by the PSA Group that owns Peugeot and Citroen. Well, not quite. The three car brands actually began collaborating on new chassis and engines some time ago, and the forthcoming Grandland X (Opel’s rival for the Nissan Qashqai) will share its chassis with the Peugeot 3008 and the Citroen C5 Aircross.
A mark of General Motors' confidence in their plans for the small car sector, and something that the Opel Kadett and the Vauxhall Viva had in common, was that the manufacturer built for each new model a completely new car plant in a region characterized by relatively high unemployment and the availability of a skilled workforce, but with no strong tradition of volume auto-making. The Vauxhall Viva was the first car built at Vauxhall's Ellesmere Port plant while the Kadett A was the first product of Opel's new purpose built Bochum plant.[1] Ellesmere Port and Bochum would effectively become sister plants, producing subsequent generations of Kadett as well as their Vauxhall badged sisters (the Chevette and Astra) for the next fifty years.

My parents bought a brand new ’67 Opel Kadett Rallye, was red/white from our local Buick dealer. I believe the price was under $2K back then. Pretty unusual around the neighborhood, as most back then drove Caddy’s, big Chryslers and V-8 Station Wagons. It had a manual stick and a am radio and bucket seats. Got pretty good mileage and our dog liked to ride around in the back window. Learned to drive in it and after awhile was quite comfortable to drive around..wished now I had it..pretty rare now..even back then.
In March 2017, Groupe PSA agreed to buy Opel, its British sister brand Vauxhall and their European auto lending business from General Motors for US$2.2 billion.[32][33] In return, General Motors will pay PSA US$3.2 billion for future European pension obligations and keep managing US$9.8 billion worth of plans for existing retirees. Furthermore, GM is responsible for paying about US$400 million annually for 15 years to fund the existing Great Britain and Germany pension plans.[32]
In the US, the 1968 Kadett took on the Olympia’s grille and there were other changes too. The Olympia and the US Kadett now were available with the bigger “high-cam” four, in 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 liter versions (no 1.7 for the US). This changed the performance equation considerably, especially in the new Rally 1900, which had a new fastback to go along with its big jump in power. The 1.9 was rated at 102 (gross) and 90 (DIN-net) hp, and there was nothing that could touch it in its class. This was the equivalent of dropping the big block V8s in the GM midsize cars, the German Chevelle SS 396.
The German company based in Rüsselsheim, which now belongs to the PSA group, made a profit in 2018 for the first time since 1999. According to Lohscheller, this enabled them to make the necessary investments in electric mobility. Opel intends to electrify its entire product range by 2024. “The smaller vehicles, in particular, are especially suitable for electric propulsion,” said the company boss, who also explained that Opel, also known as Vauxhall, is switching from nine to just two platforms: “One small and one large, which can be used throughout the group. In addition to diesel and gasoline engines, each has an electrified drive system – either purely electric or as a plug-in hybrid.”

I join in the question: “Where did they all go?” These were pretty common in the upper midwest (as imports went) in the late 60s-mid 70s. I knew a Lutheran minister who owned one (maybe a 69 or so?) in the mid 70s, and got to ride in it once. He seemed pretty proud of the fact that he had put about 80K on it and it seemed to be running strongly. Although it was starting to look a little worn, it seemed to hold up a lot better than my Scoutmaster’s 69 Cortina.

The real people’s car successor was the 1962 Kadett A. The low maintenance costs were expressly part of the recipe for success of the two-door notchback model. The lines were matter-of-fact and modern. At the same time, the interior space was anything but typical of a small car. The advertising promised “well-formed seats, plenty of legroom. We have dispensed with overhanging metalwork and unnecessary bells and whistles. That would only have cost a lot of money.” Instead, the boot was a real luggage compartment and – the fuel filler cap was on the outside! “You never have the smell of petrol in your boot,” it said with a wink towards Wolfsburg. With its modern, water-cooled front engine, the Kadett offered a further design advantage over the Beetle. “Opel Kadett, in short: O.K.” – Opel built almost 650,000 units by 1965 alone.
In April 1993, the Corsa B was unveiled and in the United Kingdom Vauxhall dropped the Nova name, with the car from now being known as the Corsa.[21] In May 1994, it was launched by Holden in Australia, as the Barina, replacing a version of the Suzuki Swift sold under that name.[22] This proved a success, and was the first Spanish built car to be sold in significant volumes in the Australian market.[23]

Vrednosti ne uzimaju u obzir posebno korišćenje, uslove vožnje, opremu ili opcije i mogu varirati u zavisnosti od dimenzija pneumatika. Više informacija o zvaničnim vrednostima za potrošnju goriva i emisiju CO2 naći ćete u uputstvu ,, Uputstvo za potrošnju goriva i emisiju CO2 za nova putnička vozila” koje je besplatno dostupno na svim prodajnim mestima ili kod imenovanog državnog organa.
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^ General Motors Austria Gesellschaft m.b.H. (GMA, founded 1963 as sales organisation; from 1979: Administration, Non-productive Departments an Sales) and General Motors Austria Werke Gesellschaft m.b.H. (GMAW founded 1979; Production). In November 1987 GMAW (Austrian Handelsregister, HRB 24.436) were merged into GMA (HRB 20.133b, actual Firmenbuch FN 110500a).


Everlasting Design Car Which Requires Lots Of Care — A very beautiful car from the 90's. I was very happy when was able to buy a Calibra. There are a lot of raunchy, broken-down-looking Calibras running outside, so preserving it's condition is rather hard. I love this car, it has great performance, easy and fun to drive, it gives much pleasure. It's interior is not so good looking, but overall handling is easy. Great sportscar. Once you fell in love, you won't change your mind. I'll never sell it.
In 1982 Opel once again accomplished a great feat with a small car: the Corsa A joined the range below the Kadett, which by now was becoming a compact model. Designed by Chief Designer Erhard Schnell, who also penned the legendary Opel GT, the only 3.62m-long Corsa was notable for its prominent rally-car wheel arches and a drag coefficient of 0.36. Offered initially as a two-door hatchback and sedan, and a five-door as of 1985, the Corsa again demonstrated how masterfully Opel can generate space on a small platform. The 100hp GSi also combined frugality with fun. Originally conceived as an entry-level model for those on a tight budget, the Corsa A had become a bestseller by 1993 with a total of 3.1 million units sold.

+) Podaci o potrošnji goriva i emisiji CO2 određeni su prema Globalno usklađenom ispitnom postupku za laka vozila (WLTP), u skladu s uredbama R (EC) br. 715/2007 i R (EU) br. 2017/1151. Vrednosti ne uzimaju u obzir posebno korišćenje i uslove vožnje. Više informacija o zvaničnim vrednostima za potrošnju goriva i emisiju CO2 naći ćete u uputstvu ,,Uputstvo za potrošnju goriva i emisiju CO2 za nova putnička vozila” koje je besplatno dostupno na svim prodajnim mestima ili kod imenovanog državnog organa.

Valorile nu iau în calcul utilizări și condiții de conducere, echipamente sau opțiuni particulare și pot varia în funcție de formatul pneurilor. Valorile nu iau în calcul utilizări particulare și condiții de conducere, echipamente sau opțiuni și pot varia în funcție de formatul pneurilor. Pentru mai multe informații privind valorile oficiale ale consumului de carburant și ale emisiilor de CO2, te rugăm să citești „Ghidul privind consumul de carburant și emisiile de CO2 ale autoturismelor noi” disponibil gratuit la toate punctele de vânzare sau la autoritatea de stat sau organismul desemnat.
The Kadett A (above) finally appeared in 1962, and was a classic GM/Opel effort: highly pragmatic, conventional in every respect, reasonably stylish for its time, and designed to deliver a good bang for the buck. In just about every way possible, it was the antithesis of the VW: front-engine rwd, a rather tinny but roomy body, highly tossable but with a primitive suspension and ride, a very roomy trunk, and excellent visibility as well as economy. Oh, and a proper heater even! Its little 987 cc OHV four made 40 net/46 gross hp, six more than the VW 1200. Its trim fighting weight of 1475 lbs (670 kg), some two hundred pounds less than the VW, showed in both its acceleration and body integrity.
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