Opel has teased the arrival of its all-new supermini, the 2019 Corsa, with a single image on its social media. Captioned with "Revolutionary. Electrifying. Accessible!" on Twitter, the picture shows the car's headlight and... actually, it's just a headlight. The daytime-running light signature borrows heavily from the GT X Experimental concept, with its angular, inverted Nike 'Swoosh' design...
Further information about official fuel consumption, official specific CO2 emissions and consumption of electric energy can be found in the “guideline about fuel consumption, CO2 Emissions and electric energy consumption of new passenger cars” ('Leitfaden über den Kraftstoffverbrauch, die CO2-Emissionen und den Stromverbrauch neuer Personenkraftwagen') in German language, which is available free of charge at any point of sales and at DAT Deutsche Automobil Treuhand GmbH, Helmuth-Hirth-Straße 1, D-73760 Ostfildern. 
Customers and experts are already enthusiastic about the IntelliLux LED® matrix lighting technology in the Opel Insignia flagship and Astra compact cars: in Europe, 20 per cent of Astra drivers and 60 per cent of Insignia customers order this innovative system. Around 90,000 new Opel cars equipped with matrix technology thus enter the European market per year. The glare-free matrix headlights automatically and continuously adapt to the prevailing traffic situation and surroundings. Approaching traffic and preceding vehicles are simply “cut out” of the illuminated area. Glare is minimised and drivers enjoy optimum visibility - as will soon be the case with the new-generation Opel Corsa.
In the US, some 500 Buick dealers started carrying the Kadett in 1964, after their previous sole product, the larger Rekord, was knocked out of the ring by GM’s own 1960/1961 compacts. I strongly suspect the Buick dealers (and their ad agency) who hadn’t yet taken down their Opel signs were not really very committed or motivated, and all of 17k ’64s and 14k ’65 Kadett A were sold. Meanwhile, VW was moving some 400k Beetles in America.

Valorile nu iau în calcul utilizări și condiții de conducere, echipamente sau opțiuni particulare și pot varia în funcție de formatul pneurilor. Valorile nu iau în calcul utilizări particulare și condiții de conducere, echipamente sau opțiuni și pot varia în funcție de formatul pneurilor. Pentru mai multe informații privind valorile oficiale ale consumului de carburant și ale emisiilor de CO2, te rugăm să citești „Ghidul privind consumul de carburant și emisiile de CO2 ale autoturismelor noi” disponibil gratuit la toate punctele de vânzare sau la autoritatea de stat sau organismul desemnat.
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You may remember the beloved Opel Kadett A named “Oliver” that Richard Hammond of Top Gear fame slogged through the Makgadikgadi Salt Pan of Botswana. He became so attached to the little car that he had it restored and owns it to this day. Hammond’s love of this classic comes with good cause as it was a secret weapon of Opel developed specifically to invade the dominance of Volkswagen during the 1960s. Even though it delivered similar levels of horsepower (around 40 hp) it did offer better heating as well as more interior and luggage space. The Kadett’s popularity and engine reliability provided a resurgence for Opel and the car was exported to many countries including the United States. Whether you punish yours in the muck and mud or reserve your driving strictly to the road is entirely up to you.

The Kadett A (above) finally appeared in 1962, and was a classic GM/Opel effort: highly pragmatic, conventional in every respect, reasonably stylish for its time, and designed to deliver a good bang for the buck. In just about every way possible, it was the antithesis of the VW: front-engine rwd, a rather tinny but roomy body, highly tossable but with a primitive suspension and ride, a very roomy trunk, and excellent visibility as well as economy. Oh, and a proper heater even! Its little 987 cc OHV four made 40 net/46 gross hp, six more than the VW 1200. Its trim fighting weight of 1475 lbs (670 kg), some two hundred pounds less than the VW, showed in both its acceleration and body integrity.

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