I join in the question: “Where did they all go?” These were pretty common in the upper midwest (as imports went) in the late 60s-mid 70s. I knew a Lutheran minister who owned one (maybe a 69 or so?) in the mid 70s, and got to ride in it once. He seemed pretty proud of the fact that he had put about 80K on it and it seemed to be running strongly. Although it was starting to look a little worn, it seemed to hold up a lot better than my Scoutmaster’s 69 Cortina.
Joseph DeBattista and his son, Joey, acquired this Lapis Blue wonder after trading a Volkswagen. Owing to its rarity, they had to be creative with the restoration. While Joey was hunting for parts on eBay, his father bent metal to perfection, slowly completing a car that will always remain an underdog, a nice conversation starter, and a fail-proof daily driver. Just ask Richard Hammond, if you need more proof.
The Kadett C formed the basis o the Breetish Vauxhall Chevette, which haed a restyled front end an launcht wi a hatchback body, in addition tae uisin a 1256 cc OHV (ower-heid valve) Vauxhall ingine rather than the 1196 cc OHV Opel ingine. The Chevette made the Kadett C notable bi allouin it tae acome Opel's first hatchback — a version named Kadett City appeared in August 1975,[3] based on the Chevette's hatchback body. The Kadett's coupé body style wis niver manufactured as a Chevette housomeivver. Awtho Kadett C production endit in 1979, the Chevette wis produced till Januar 1984. Unuisually for Vauxhall models, the Chevette wis importit tae Germany startin in 1979 tae satisfee the needs o the rear wheel drive traditionalists an wis quite a success for a year or twa. This import version, housomeivver wis niver offeecially badged as an Opel or a Vauxhall - bein named simply as 'Chevette'.
It had some crazy mechanical issues. At one point it stumbled and stalled because the carburetor had come loose from the intake manifold and I had to tighten it back down! Another time, my brother was driving it and the brakes failed. Somehow the end of the brake shoe that meets the brake cylinder piston had become worn on one side, causing the piston to slip off the end of the shoe when the brakes were applied, losing braking and squirting fluid all over.
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