In 1982 Opel once again accomplished a great feat with a small car: the Corsa A joined the range below the Kadett, which by now was becoming a compact model. Designed by Chief Designer Erhard Schnell, who also penned the legendary Opel GT, the only 3.62m-long Corsa was notable for its prominent rally-car wheel arches and a drag coefficient of 0.36. Offered initially as a two-door hatchback and sedan, and a five-door as of 1985, the Corsa again demonstrated how masterfully Opel can generate space on a small platform. The 100hp GSi also combined frugality with fun. Originally conceived as an entry-level model for those on a tight budget, the Corsa A had become a bestseller by 1993 with a total of 3.1 million units sold.
The instrument panel and center stack are clearly structured and horizontally aligned to the driver. The cluster and air vents feature subtle chrome finishes, conveying a message of high quality, while the available 8-inch color touchscreen is seamless integrated into the centerstack and features modern IntelliLink infotainment system, including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility.
CROSSLAND X 1.2N M/TFrom R 294,638​Enquire NowDownload SpecificationsThe 1.2 MT has standard features such as:​15˝ steel wheel with hubcapsCruise control with speed limiterPower windows front & rear with auto up and down functionAutomatic headlight control (auto light switch)Outside rear-view mirrors: powered and heated , body colour , manual foldingRadio R 4.0: IntelliLink 7˝ Infotainment System ,USB, Bluetooth®Polyurethane steering wheel: multifunction ,cruise control and speed limiter controls​Front seats: driver: 4-way manually adjustable ,co-driver: 2-way manually adjustable2nd-row seats: 40/60 split foldable benchManual air-conditioningDriver and co-driver airbags: front airbags ,side airbags front and roof rear side airbagsFront and rear disc brakesSeat belt warning indicatorAdaptive brake light​
A mark of General Motors' confidence in their plans for the small car sector, and something that the Opel Kadett and the Vauxhall Viva had in common, was that the manufacturer built for each new model a completely new car plant in a region characterized by relatively high unemployment and the availability of a skilled workforce, but with no strong tradition of volume auto-making. The Vauxhall Viva was the first car built at Vauxhall's Ellesmere Port plant while the Kadett A was the first product of Opel's new purpose built Bochum plant.[1] Ellesmere Port and Bochum would effectively become sister plants, producing subsequent generations of Kadett as well as their Vauxhall badged sisters (the Chevette and Astra) for the next fifty years.
Furthermore, the KARL ROCKS also caters for customers looking for an alternative fuel offering and is available with the 1.0 LPG ecoFLEX ex works (NEDC LPG consumption: urban 7.1 l/100 km, extra-urban 5.2 l/100 km, combined 5.9 l/100 km; 95 g/km CO2; NEDC fuel consumption: urban 5.8 l/100 km, extra-urban 4.1 l/100 km, combined 4.7 l/100 km; 108 g/km CO2). When ordered in this combination, owners can cover a total distance of 1,019 kilometers (in accordance with NEDC) between visits to the filling station thanks to the 32-liter gasoline and the 20-liter LPG tanks.
The way it nearly came to the US is interesting, though. Back then, GM North America was a very different place than GM Europe, and it looked like there was very little interest in bridging the gap, unlike today. But after GM bought a 50% stake in the Trollhattan trolls, the General was now burdened with the problem of attracting more than devotees to an aging lineup at dealerships. The solution was to sell the Calibra to Americans through Saab dealerships, but badged as a Saab.

The generous feeling of space and the first-class AGR ergonomic seats in the Crossland X make long trips comfortable. The crossover also convinces with a high level of flexibility, which can also be put down to its individually sliding rear seats. They come with a 60/40 split and can be moved by up to 150 millimeters, increasing trunk space from 410 to a class-leading 520 liters in seconds. Trunk volume increases to 1,255 liters if the rear seats are folded down completely. The Crossland X can be locked, opened and started with Keyless Open & Start.
Unlike the previous model, there was no saloon version for the European market, but one was designed in Brazil for the Latin American market, as saloons were much preferred to hatchbacks there. This was also introduced in South Africa and India. An estate car, panel van and pickup truck were also introduced, and a convertible version was produced for the Australian market, called the Holden Barina Cabrio.
Instead, it had the same front fascia as the Latin American Chevrolet Corsa, possibly because GM South Africa wanted the same front fascia as the sedan and pickup, as swapping with the European front fascia would have been expensive sawing and welding due to the Latin American Corsa's sharper headlights. This car was 2001 Semperit Irish Car of the Year in Ireland.
Unlike the previous model, there was no saloon version for the European market, but one was designed in Brazil for the Latin American market, as saloons were much preferred to hatchbacks there. This was also introduced in South Africa and India. An estate car, panel van and pickup truck were also introduced, and a convertible version was produced for the Australian market, called the Holden Barina Cabrio.
The Kadett featured a more modern design than the Volkswagen Beetle that then dominated the market for small family cars in West Germany and various surrounding countries. The Kadett offered more passenger space, more luggage capacity, and better visibility for the driver. Its water-cooled engine provided effective heating for the passenger compartment. However, by the mid-1970s the Kadett's weakness was already apparent as the car's bodywork was not well protected from corrosion.
The Rally’s 1100 cc SR engine was hardly a drag-strip terror: the little 1100cc buzz-bomb got higher compression and a second carburetor, as well as possibly some other changes. The result was 67 gross/60 DIN-net hp. And what little torque there was, now moved even higher into the rpm range. I can hear their raspy and nervous exhaust in my ears still, as common as they were now in the Towson area. Undoubtedly, they improved on the regular Kadett’s 21 second 0-60 dash by maybe a couple of seconds. But they looked good doing it, as well as sounding good.
This time it was from simply wearing them out, but my 18 year old mother had no idea that tires were something you had to replace. “You don’t have to replace the doors or the wheels or the windshield, why would you have to replace the tires, it’s just part of the car,” she had reasoned. She’s a whip-smart lady but somehow had missed that one. Her father had hilariously taught her how to change a tire (by making her figure it out on the street downtown while everyone they knew drove by and offered to help, as he turned them away one by one while the 5’2″, 90 lb teenager did it herself) but I guess kids think they know everything.
About 6 months ago my stepfather, call me and said that i had to buy car, i said I don’t need a car, and he said, well you have to buy this one, its a special car. I ask him wich car is, and he told me Opel Kadett 4 doors from 1968, i ask him what was the condition of the car and he told like new, and i laugh 😂, because how could be after 50 years. I agree to buy it, at the time i was abroad, and when i retun home after a couple of months,… Read more »
All figures quoted relate to the EU base model with standard equipment. Fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are determined according to regulations R (EC) No. 715/2007 and R (EC) No. 692/2008, taking into consideration the vehicle weight in running order, as specified. Additional equipment and options may lead to higher results than stated. The figures do not relate to a specific vehicle and are not part of an offer. They are provided only for the purpose of comparison between different vehicles but may differ from the actual fuel consumption and Co2 achieved in real-life driving conditions which are influenced by driving style and operating conditions. Additional equipment may increase the weight of the vehicle when empty and in some cases the permissible axle weights as well as the permissible total weight and reduce the permissible towing weights. This may lead to a reduction in top speed and increased acceleration time. Driving performance figures assume a 75 kg driver plus a 125 kg load. 2 H gas in m3/100 km.
As it turned out, the Opels were still lacking in this department. Manuel Reuter was fastest of the two with 5th on the grid, while Keke Rosberg clocked a disappointing 9th time. Both managed to be slower than several of the lesser Mercedes. Both races left much to be desired as well, with Rosberg finishing 7th in Race 1. Reuter retired with electronic gremlins after just 6 laps, and was forced to miss Race 2. Rosberg was felled by similar issues in Race 2, and slowed after 10 laps.
Unlike the previous model, there was no saloon version for the European market, but one was designed in Brazil for the Latin American market, as saloons were much preferred to hatchbacks there. This was also introduced in South Africa and India. An estate car, panel van and pickup truck were also introduced, and a convertible version was produced for the Australian market, called the Holden Barina Cabrio.
The origin of the lightning in the 2012 Opel logo lies in the truck Opel Blitz (German Blitz = English "lightning"), which had been a commercial success, widely used also within the Wehrmacht, Nazi Germany's military. Originally, the logo for this truck consisted of two stripes arranged loosely like a lightning symbol with the words "Opel" and "Blitz" in them, in later, 1950s models simplified to the horizontal form of a lightning which appears in the current Opel logo. The jag in the lightning always follows the original from the "Opel Blitz" text stripes, in the form of a horizontally stretched letter "Z".
The engine came with a choice from two power levels. For the standard 1.0 litre engine maximum output was listed as 40 PS (29 kW) at 5,000 rpm, and in October 1963 the high compression "1.0 S-Motor" was added, sharing the 993 cc capacity of the original power unit, but offering a maximum 48 PS (35 kW) of power at 5,400 rpm.[7] The more powerful "S-Motor" engine featured modifications to the inlet manifold, cylinders and camshaft along with a carburetor employing larger (36 mm (1.4 in) diameter than the 30 mm (1.2 in) used on the standard engine. This came with an 8.8: 1 compression ratio whereas the 40 PS (29 kW; 39 hp) engine used a compression ratio of only 7.8 : 1.[8] Higher compression ratios for performance versions of standard engines were a growing trend in West Germany in the 1960s, led by Opel and Ford, and made possible by the growing availability of higher octane "Super" grade fuel at filling stations.
Launched in 1962, GM Europe's small car for the 1960s, the Opel Kadett, looked like a shrunk Chevy Nova, and hid a 1.0-liter water-cooled overhead-valve four-cylinder up its nose. While this motor had pre-War origins, it was a good one. It weighed just 211 lbs, revved beyond 6000 rpm, and made 54 horsepower in the high-compression 'S' version, as long as you used premium fuel.
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