After the Second World War the Soviet Union requested the tooling from the Opel Rüsselsheim car plant in the American occupation zone as part of the war reparations agreed by the victorious powers, to compensate for the loss of the production lines for the domestic KIM-10-52 in the siege of Moscow. Faced with a wide range of German "small litrage" models to choose from, Soviet planners wanted a car which closely followed the general type of the KIM – a 4-door sedan with all-metal body and 4-stroke engine. They therefore rejected both the rear-engined, two-door KdF-Wagen (future VW Beetle) and the two-stroke powered, front-wheel-drive, wooden-bodied DKW F8, built by the Auto Union Chemnitz plant in the Soviet occupation zone. The closest analog of the KIM to be found was the 4-door Kadett K38.[7]

ABS-bremser, Aircondition, Auto. start/stop, Dæktryksmåler, Elruder, Fartpilot, Servo, Sædevarme Ikke ryger. Aircon., Fartpilot, Rat- og Sædevarme, Bluetooth, Cityparkering, El-ruder, Metallak, Fjernb. centrallås, Automatisk start/stop, Håndfri telefon, Dæktrykmåler Der medfølger vinterdæk Undervognsbehandling fra ny og inderskærm/stænklapper Pæn og velholdt. 1 ejer. Service overholdt
the Chevy Chevette, while a MUCH better car than the Vega was at the time, and even now, that’s not saying a whole lot, other than it WAS infinitely more durable and longer lasting and reliable than the Vega, though by ’76, the Vega was decent enough, but the damage was done. I know as my Mom drove a ’76 Vega from roughly 78-83 with the only major thing being the carb being rebuilt around 1980. The Chevette was basically a redesigned Kadett/Vauxhaul Chevette.
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