One of my step-daughters works at a Michael Kors retail store, and she keeps coming home with overpriced clothing and jewelry that she gets at an alleged discount, but she just can’t seem to understand that an “MK” logo on a watch doesn’t make it a nice watch, it makes it a cheap Asian watch with a fancy logo on it. She doesn’t understand the concept of value, she is something of a “brand whore” like her father.
^ Heinz Michaels (24 August 1962). "Opel bläst zum Angriff auf VW: Mit tausend "Kadetten" pro Tag – Ein neues Firmen jahrhundert, eine neue Fabrik, ein neuer Wagen: ....In der letzten Hauptversammlung hatte der Vorstand alle Versuche, die hausväterisch wieder angesammelten Reserven anzugreifen, gerade deshalb entschlossen abgewiesen. Mahnend sagte Prof. Nordhoff damals: "Hinter beiden Unternehmen (General Motors und Ford) steht eine Finanzkraft, der kein deutsches Unternehmen etwas auch nur annähernd Gleichwertiges entgegenzusetzen hat, und der Wille des Eindringens in den deutschen Markt um jeden Preis scheint vorhanden zu sein.""". ZEIT ONLINE. Retrieved 2013-05-12.

But the hot news of the new Kadett B line was the mid-year 1966 introduction of the Rally. Sporting both fog and driving lights, as well as the obligatory racing stripes, the Rally was something altogether new in the small-car market: the first really overt attempt to sell sportiness in the lowest end of the small-car market, at least in the USA. The Ford Cortina GT had been doing it for a few years, but was one class bigger and a fair bit more expensive. The Opel Rally set the template for all the little pocket rockets to come; just like with the big American muscle cars, blatant economy was out, and performance, or at least the impersonation of it, were in.

Many Opel models or models based on Opel architectures have been sold in Australia and New Zealand under the Holden marque, such as the Holden Barina (1994-2005), which were rebadged versions of the Opel Corsa, the Holden Astra. a version of the Opel Astra, and the Captiva 5, a version of the Opel Antara. In New Zealand, the Opel Kadett and Ascona were sold as niche models by General Motors New Zealand in the 1980s, while the Opel brand was used on the Opel Vectra until 1994.


Opel traces its roots to a sewing machine manufacturer founded by Adam Opel in 1862 in Rüsselsheim am Main. The company began manufacturing bicycles in 1886 and produced its first automobile in 1899. After listing on the stock market in 1929, General Motors took a majority stake in Opel and then full control in 1931, establishing the American reign over the German automaker for nearly 90 years.[1]
But the hot news of the new Kadett B line was the mid-year 1966 introduction of the Rally. Sporting both fog and driving lights, as well as the obligatory racing stripes, the Rally was something altogether new in the small-car market: the first really overt attempt to sell sportiness in the lowest end of the small-car market, at least in the USA. The Ford Cortina GT had been doing it for a few years, but was one class bigger and a fair bit more expensive. The Opel Rally set the template for all the little pocket rockets to come; just like with the big American muscle cars, blatant economy was out, and performance, or at least the impersonation of it, were in.
While the Ipanema clearly succeeded the Marajó, production of the Chevette (by now in sedan form only, the hatchback having been discontinued after the 1987 model year) and of the Kadett noticeably overlapped; the newer model was placed above the old one in Chevrolet's lineup. While Chevrolet entertained the possibility of a pick-up version of the Kadett E, it never materialized.
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