In 2007, Opel introduced sport version of Corsa tuned by Opel Performance Center (OPC) – Corsa OPC. Corsa have 1.6 litre I4 turbo engine with 141 kW (192 PS; 189 hp) at 5.850 rpm and 230 N⋅m (170 lb⋅ft) of torque at 1,980 to 5,850 rpm, with overboost function which boost up torque figure to 266 N⋅m (196 lb⋅ft). 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) time is 7.2 s and top speed is 225 km/h (140 mph). Differences with standard Corsa in interior are sporty Recaro seats, OPC steering wheel and gear knob, instrument dials with OPC background.

The Corsa A was rebadged as the "Vauxhall Nova" between 1983 to 1993 for the United Kingdom. It replaced the ageing Vauxhall Chevette. All Nova models were manufactured in Spain, with the first customers in the United Kingdom taking delivery of their cars in April 1983. It gave Vauxhall a much needed modern competitor in the supermini market in the United Kingdom, as the Chevette was older than the majority of its main competitors which consisted of the Ford Fiesta and the Austin Metro.
GODE FINANSIERING MULIGHEDER MED UDBETALING OG UDEN, TIL EN LAV MÅNEDLIG YDELSE, VI TILBYDER OGSÅ FORSIKRING MED KASKO TIL EN RIGTIG GOD PRIS, GIV OS ET KALD SÅ VI KAN GIVE DIG ET GODT TILBUD. Alu., C.Lås, Infocenter, Startspærre, Cd/Radio, Isofix, Bagagerumsdækken, Kopholder, Stofindtræk, Splitbagsæde, Automatisk Lys, Airbag, Abs, Antispin, Esp, Servo, Ikke Ryger, Lev. Nysynet
Four cylinder power came from 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 litre Family 1 petrol engines, as well as an economical 1.5 L turbodiesel engine. Most cars received a five speed manual transmission, although a four speed automatic was also available with certain engines. In the first few years, a four speed manual was also available coupled to the smallest 1.2 litre engine.[25]
Production started on December 4, 1946. The Moskvitch 400/420 continued to be made in Moscow with some minor changes until 1956, when it was replaced by the Moskvitch 402. The latter was an all-new design apart from the engine, for which Moskvitch continued to use the Kadett side-valve engine until 1958, when it was replaced with a domestically designed OHV engine.[7]
Sloan suggested that GM take the helm of Opel again for a two-year "probationary" period to see whether the economic conditions, then called "close to stagnation" in Germany, would improve. Sloan set other important goals: "General Motors should risk no additional capital in Opel. Credit facilities should be available. We should have complete freedom in personnel policies and administration. The products produced by Adam Opel AG should be solely within the jurisdiction of management, and if prices had to be approved by government authority, a reasonable return on the capital should be allowed."
(first posted 3/9/2012)      For those under a certain age, the name Opel Kadett may be as familiar as Richard Speck, The Troggs, or Valley of the Dolls. Yes, 1966 was a long time ago, but that’s when the second generation of Opel’s VW fighter appeared and knocked down the long-time king of the small car hill. VW should thank Opel for that thumping; it really needed the wake up call that resulted in a new world order, spelled: G-O-L-F.

While the Ipanema clearly succeeded the Marajó, production of the Chevette (by now in sedan form only, the hatchback having been discontinued after the 1987 model year) and of the Kadett noticeably overlapped; the newer model was placed above the old one in Chevrolet's lineup. While Chevrolet entertained the possibility of a pick-up version of the Kadett E, it never materialized.
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