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Rüsselsheim.  In 2019 Opel celebrates 120 years of automobile production – and thereby 120 years full of innovations for everyone. The German brand has a tradition of pioneering high-tech advancements and quickly bringing them to series production. This makes mobility affordable for many and the cars safer, cleaner, more comfortable and more practical. The 120 years advertising campaign, “Opel. Born in Germany. Made for everyone.” is based on this philosophy. It was as true of the first Opel – the Patentmotorwagen “System Lutzmann” of 1899 – as of all the other models that followed, from the “Doktorwagen” to “Laubfrosch” (Tree Frog), P4 and Kadett. Today the philosophy matches the Opel Corsa more than any other model.


The Crossland X is available with petrol, diesel and LPG engines. The petrol engines are all 1.2-litre 3-cylinder units with power outputs of 81, 110 and 130 hp (97 kW). The two higher-powered versions are turbocharged and have balance shafts. On the diesel side the Crossland X offers a 1.6-litre 4-cylinder engine with either 99 hp (74 kW) or 120 hp (89 kW). Both the 120 hp (89 kW) diesel and 130 hp (97 kW) petrol models get a 6-speed manual gearbox; the other engines come with 5-speed manuals. A 6-speed automatic is available in conjunction with the 110 hp (82 kW) engine.
Four cylinder power came from 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 litre Family 1 petrol engines, as well as an economical 1.5 L turbodiesel engine. Most cars received a five speed manual transmission, although a four speed automatic was also available with certain engines. In the first few years, a four speed manual was also available coupled to the smallest 1.2 litre engine.[25]
According to the car's manufacturer's data, the Karl needs 4,9 l of LPG per 100 km of highway driving, 7,1 l/100 km in the city and 5,7 l/100 km on average. Just for comparion, when running on petrol it requires on average 4,6 l/100 km, but don't be fooled by the sheer figures since autogas is usually by approx. 50 percent cheaper than its conventional counterpart. Given the fuel economy figures and current fuel prices, the only kind of motor vehicle cheaper to run than a Karl LPGTEC would probably be... a moped. As for CO2 emissions, the autogas-powered pocket-sized Opel spews out 93 g/km, which is less than the special ECO version running on petrol, which emits 99 g/km.
GODE FINANSIERING MULIGHEDER MED UDBETALING OG UDEN, TIL EN LAV MÅNEDLIG YDELSE, VI TILBYDER OGSÅ FORSIKRING MED KASKO TIL EN RIGTIG GOD PRIS, GIV OS ET KALD SÅ VI KAN GIVE DIG ET GODT TILBUD. Alu., C.Lås, Infocenter, Startspærre, Cd/Radio, Isofix, Bagagerumsdækken, Kopholder, Stofindtræk, Splitbagsæde, Automatisk Lys, Airbag, Abs, Antispin, Esp, Servo, Ikke Ryger, Lev. Nysynet
Under the stubby bonnet, Opel has borrowed engines as well as chassis from PSA, so the EcoTec 1.6-litre diesel is actually the French 1.6-litre BlueHDI engine wearing lederhosen and a false moustache. It’s a very good engine, in fairness. Not as refined, overall, as Opel’s home-grown 1.6, nor as powerful (120hp plays 136hp) but quieter at low rpm when cold, and with very good economy. Sadly, the six-speed manual gearbox is also brought in from France and its sloppy, loose-limbed action does not bespeak of German precision. The engine, to be honest, doesn’t seem to suit the car, surging and growling with rather too much enthusiasm and basically making a nuisance of itself. I suspect the Crossland would be better-suited to the revvy, lightweight 1.2-litre petrol engine.
In the early 1920s, Opel became the first German car manufacturer to incorporate a mass-production assembly line in the building of their automobiles. In 1924, they used their assembly line to produce a new open two-seater called the Laubfrosch (Tree frog). The Laubfrosch was finished exclusively in green lacquer. The car sold for an expensive 3,900 marks (expensive considering the less expensive manufacturing process), but by the 1930s, this type of vehicle would cost a mere 1,930 marks – due in part to the assembly line, but also due to the skyrocketing demand for cars. Adam Opel led the way for motorised transportation to become not just a means for the rich, but also a reliable way for people of all classes to travel.
The Opel Calibra is a coupé, engineered and produced by the German automaker Opel between 1989 and 1997. In the United Kingdom, where it remained on sale until 1999, it was marketed under the Vauxhall brand as the Vauxhall Calibra.[2] It was also marketed as the Chevrolet Calibra in South America by Chevrolet, and the Holden Calibra in Australia and New Zealand by Holden.
The car later became known as the Kadett A. In addition to the standard saloon, from March 1963, the manufacturer offered an L (luxury model) and an estate (branded as the "Opel Kadett Car-A-Van").[5] In October 1963 Opel introduced a coupé version of the Kadett with which buyers could enjoy enhanced style at the expense of rear seat headroom.[5][6]
Launched in 1962, GM Europe's small car for the 1960s, the Opel Kadett, looked like a shrunk Chevy Nova, and hid a 1.0-liter water-cooled overhead-valve four-cylinder up its nose. While this motor had pre-War origins, it was a good one. It weighed just 211 lbs, revved beyond 6000 rpm, and made 54 horsepower in the high-compression 'S' version, as long as you used premium fuel.
In the US, the 1968 Kadett took on the Olympia’s grille and there were other changes too. The Olympia and the US Kadett now were available with the bigger “high-cam” four, in 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 liter versions (no 1.7 for the US). This changed the performance equation considerably, especially in the new Rally 1900, which had a new fastback to go along with its big jump in power. The 1.9 was rated at 102 (gross) and 90 (DIN-net) hp, and there was nothing that could touch it in its class. This was the equivalent of dropping the big block V8s in the GM midsize cars, the German Chevelle SS 396.
The base car was available only as a two-door "Limousine" (sedan/saloon). Customers looking for a soft-top "Cabrio-limousine" would need to specify a "Kadett Spezial". For the first time Kadett buyers, provided they were prepared to choose a "Kadett Spezial" could also specify a four-door "Limousine" (sedan/saloon) bodied car, priced at 2,350 Marks as against 2,150 Marks for a "Spezial Cabrio-Limousine" and 2,100 Marks for a two-door "Spezial Limousine". 

He dropped by my house early one Friday evening the day he bought it at Ackerman Buick in Ferguson, MO, picked me up, drove to a buddy’s, picked him up and we took off over the bridge into Illinois to ride all the levee roads and every other back road we could find. We had to drop off our buddy around 9 o’clock, put $1.80 in the tank and went back to Illinois! We finally returned home after midnight and somehow put over 250 miles on the car in that time!
Not only was the body a bit bigger, but the Kadett B also had a slightly enlarged 1100 cc engine. This was externally a very compact motor indeed, and looked rather lost in the Kadett’s Kavernous engine bay. Power output increased correspondingly; there were 45 and 55 DIN hp (high compression) versions for Europe; the weaker on was sent stateside with a 54 (gross) hp rating.
The handling and ride are basically fine, but are all but invisible from the point of view of a keen driver. The Crossland is tidy through corners, with reasonable steering weight but no actual feedback, and the body tilts over only to a reasonable angle. The ride is a touch stiff in its damping, especially around town (which is disappointing, given that any Crossland will probably spend most of its life in town) but it does improve on the open road. Refinement is only average though with quite a bit of wind and road noise. There’s little point in having Opel’s phone-based OnStar concierge service fitted if you can’t hear what the operator is saying . . .
Everlasting Design Car Which Requires Lots Of Care — A very beautiful car from the 90's. I was very happy when was able to buy a Calibra. There are a lot of raunchy, broken-down-looking Calibras running outside, so preserving it's condition is rather hard. I love this car, it has great performance, easy and fun to drive, it gives much pleasure. It's interior is not so good looking, but overall handling is easy. Great sportscar. Once you fell in love, you won't change your mind. I'll never sell it.

Opisane i ilustrovane karakteristike mogu se odnositi na ili prikazivati opcionu opremu koja nije uključena u standardnu isporuku. Navedene informacije bile su tačne u vreme objavljivanja. Zadržavamo pravo izmene dizajna i opreme. Prikazane boje samo približno odgovaraju stvarnim bojama. Ilustrovana opciona oprema dostupna je uz doplatu. Dostupnost, tehničke karakteristike i oprema koja se isporučuje na našim vozilima mogu varirati ili biti dostupni samo u pojedinim zemljama ili samo uz doplatu. Za preciznije informacije o opremi koja se isporučuje na našim vozilima, možete se obatiti lokalnom ovlašćenom Opel partneru.


like the dealerships advertised,a stock vr ss 5.0 v8 will smoke it,does the 0-100k sprint in 6.0 seconds flat(standard engine+ecu parameters),oddly enough the dealerships rated the v8 as a 7 sec 0-100k car,it was over 22k au cheaper than the calibra,back in 95,obviously a marketing conn from the dealerships,thats not to say that the calibra can turn into a real beast with a phase 1-2-3 kit,
My Familys first car in the US was a used 1959 Opel Rekord – I dont remember that one much but when I was 4 we got a powder blue Kadett Wagon – My mother a Berliner loved Opels – 1978-79 my Sister inherited the car as her first car and then I got it as a hand me down again in 1981 – when I first got it it had never been driven over 50 MPH so I was a bit of a shock to the poor car – but even back then it got amazing gas mileage. That is until we took it to a mechanic for a tune up and he had apparently wasn’t good with european makes – he went to adjust the carburetor and some spring loaded valve shot out and we couldnt find parts anywhere by that time. gas mileage dropped massively and running poorly the car died while crossing on the side of a field on a farm. The family there adopted it as a bit of a fort – clubhouse for a few years as we chose to buy another car when I graduated – I miss the simplicity of the car – of course I remember it fondly by I’m betting the reality of it would be a shock!
Another unique aspect to Opel nomenclature is its use of the "Caravan" (originally styled as 'Car-A-Van') name to denote its station wagon body configuration, (similar to Volkswagen's Variant or Audi's Avant designations), a practice the company observed for many decades, which finally ceased with the 2008 Insignia and 2009 Astra, where the name "Sports Tourer" is now used for the estate/station wagon versions.
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On the British motoring show Top Gear, Richard Hammond drove a 1963 Kadett A through the middle of Botswana and across the Makgadikgadi Salt Pan. He loved the car so much that he named it Oliver and later had the car shipped to the United Kingdom and restored, and it remains in his possession. It appeared on Richard Hammond's Blast Lab with the personalised number plate 'OL1 V3R'. It also appeared in the Top Gear lorry challenge as one of the used obstacles.[9]
In 1993, a 125 kW/168 hp 2.5 litre V6 (C25XE or SE4) was introduced. Available with both manual and automatic transmissions, the V6 was not as fast as the Turbo, but was rather more civilised, and proved to be more reliable than the complex four wheel drive model. 1995 saw the introduction of the X20XEV Ecotec engine, a new version of the classic C20XE 16 valve or "red top" engine.
Furthermore, the KARL ROCKS also caters for customers looking for an alternative fuel offering and is available with the 1.0 LPG ecoFLEX ex works (NEDC LPG consumption: urban 7.1 l/100 km, extra-urban 5.2 l/100 km, combined 5.9 l/100 km; 95 g/km CO2; NEDC fuel consumption: urban 5.8 l/100 km, extra-urban 4.1 l/100 km, combined 4.7 l/100 km; 108 g/km CO2). When ordered in this combination, owners can cover a total distance of 1,019 kilometers (in accordance with NEDC) between visits to the filling station thanks to the 32-liter gasoline and the 20-liter LPG tanks.
Clever design tweaks set the KARL ROCKS apart from most of its A-segment rivals. The functional silver roof rails, rugged front and rear bumpers with integrated skid pads, front and rear wheelhouse moldings and unique 15-inch bi-color-look alloy wheels blend in perfectly with typical Opel design cues such as the Opel blade that sweeps dynamically up towards the rear. Combined with the sloping roofline this creates a dynamic, sporty appearance that links the KARL ROCKS to the KARL while simultaneously giving it a distinct rugged look.
The other reason for the B’s success had to do with GM: once again, after having failed to slow down the VW’s ascent with their 1960-1961 compacts, they were forced to take the small car market seriously. That led eventually to the Vega in 1971, but in the shorter term, it meant marketing the Opel as something other than with which to remodel the garage. Now the Kadett family, which included a new fastback coupe, sedans and wagon, was seen in front of the typical American garage: two Opels for the price of one Buick.
Opel and Vauxhall have previewed the next-generation Corsa hatchback with an official set of images showing a camouflaged prototype being put through its paces. Set to debut sometime later in 2019, the fifth-gen Corsa is set to move to the PSA Group's 'CMP' modular platform for compact vehicles, which already underpins the new DS 3 Crossback and Peugeot 208...
The Karl's overall shape reminds of the Chevy Spark, but Opel made sure people will distinguish it via it's typical "frowned smile" front end, oblique taillamps that flow into the quarter panels as well as three sharp creases on the sides to suggest the automaker's precision and sharp design orientation. The interior looks light and minimalistic but it can be packed with a lot of tech and will accommodate up to five passengers.
Quite a few of these were sold in Canada in the 1960’s as they were cheap, along with other associated dreck like the Viva. They were famously for skinflints, the kinds of dads who boasted how cheap he got everything. The problem in places like Ottawa was the cars couldn’t handle the frigid winters and moonscape roads. They were very light and Canadian winters pounded them to dust in a few years.
Things are a little better up front, where we find driver and passenger seats approved by the Aktion Gesunder Rucken, or German Bad Back Association. They are truly, properly comfortable, and even long journeys fail to induce numb-bum, nor thigh-tremble. It does go a bit downhill from there though. The fascia and instrument panel are pulled, more or less directly, from the Corsa hatch, which means everything’s reasonably well made, but a bit dour and glum in appearance. That contrasts sharply to the quirkier, more welcoming interiors of the Crossland’s French cousins. There are good things – the seven-inch IntelliLink touchscreen is clear and good to use, albeit it has a slightly messy menu system, but the main dials look drab, and items such as the column stalks actually feel quite fragile and cheap.
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