Announced in November 1947, production of the postwar Olympia, with austere painted hubcaps, began in December 1948 and allowed a modest return to export sales in that year. In October 1948, the Kapitän came back to the Opel line-up, unchanged except for such details as the shape of the headlights and improvements in the leaf springs and dampers. Prices in 1948 were 9950 DM for the Kapitän and 6,785 DM for the Olympia (the Deutschmark having replaced the Reichsmark on 20 June 1948).

The handling and ride are basically fine, but are all but invisible from the point of view of a keen driver. The Crossland is tidy through corners, with reasonable steering weight but no actual feedback, and the body tilts over only to a reasonable angle. The ride is a touch stiff in its damping, especially around town (which is disappointing, given that any Crossland will probably spend most of its life in town) but it does improve on the open road. Refinement is only average though with quite a bit of wind and road noise. There’s little point in having Opel’s phone-based OnStar concierge service fitted if you can’t hear what the operator is saying . . .
Peugeot and Citroën are working with China’s Dongfeng Motor on a brand new Common Modular Platform (also known as EMP1) tailored to small cars and it will be put to good use in the next Corsa. As a matter of fact, the French group has already announced the 2019 Corsa will use hardware from PSA, so don’t be too surprised if it will inherit a significant amount of components from the new 208.
The Corsa OPC features a sports chassis with Frequency Selective Damping (FSD) technology, which enables the damping forces to adapt to the frequency of the car to balance sportiness with comfort. The suspension is lowered by 10mm (0.39 in) compared to standard Corsa models, and the car also gets an optimised steering system with more direct and precise reactions. OPC also worked on the brakes, adding 308mm discs on the front axle.

Opel va depune eforturi susținute pentru a asigura acuratețea și actualizarea conținutului acestei pagini de internet, dar nu își asumă răspunderea pentru niciun fel de daune sau pierderi cauzate de utilizarea informațiilor de pe pagina de internet. Anumite informații de pe această pagină de internet pot fi incorecte ca urmare a modificărilor aduse produselor de la lansarea acestora. Unele dintre echipamentele descrise sau ilustrate pot fi disponibile doar pentru anumite piețe sau la un preț suplimentar. Opel își rezervă dreptul de a schimba oricând specificațiile produselor. Pentru specificațiile actuale ale produsului comercializat în țara ta, te rugăm să contactezi dealerul Opel local.
My dad bought a Kadett when we became a two-car family in the 60’s (Mom got the Rambler Rebel, and then a 72 Impala). It lasted until ’77, when we used the Impala to help push it down the highway and into the Olds dealership where they were having a “We’ll give you $1000 for whatever you can drive onto the lot” trade in sale. (Sadly, we got an awful 77 Cutlas Supreme). I got some of my early driving lessons (in the neighborhood) in that Opel – shifting gears from the passenger seat, or sometimes riding on my Dads lap and steering.
Things are a little better up front, where we find driver and passenger seats approved by the Aktion Gesunder Rucken, or German Bad Back Association. They are truly, properly comfortable, and even long journeys fail to induce numb-bum, nor thigh-tremble. It does go a bit downhill from there though. The fascia and instrument panel are pulled, more or less directly, from the Corsa hatch, which means everything’s reasonably well made, but a bit dour and glum in appearance. That contrasts sharply to the quirkier, more welcoming interiors of the Crossland’s French cousins. There are good things – the seven-inch IntelliLink touchscreen is clear and good to use, albeit it has a slightly messy menu system, but the main dials look drab, and items such as the column stalks actually feel quite fragile and cheap.
Another unique aspect to Opel nomenclature is its use of the "Caravan" (originally styled as 'Car-A-Van') name to denote its station wagon body configuration, (similar to Volkswagen's Variant or Audi's Avant designations), a practice the company observed for many decades, which finally ceased with the 2008 Insignia and 2009 Astra, where the name "Sports Tourer" is now used for the estate/station wagon versions.

Despite its age, the Opel/Vauxhall Corsa was ranked #10 in Europe's best-selling cars top last year. An all-new model is right around the corner and it should help the supermini put up a good fight against other subcompact hatchbacks like the next-gen Renault Clio and Peugeot 208. Today, Opel is releasing some technical details about its revamped five-door-only city car, emphasizing on the diet it’ll be going through for its sixth iteration.
The Kadett D was introduced in the middle of August 1979, with deliveries on the home market beginning early in September 1979.[14] In November 1979, the car went on sale in the United Kingdom, some five months before the Vauxhall Astra Mark 1, the British version, was launched in April 1980. The cars were designed as three- or five-door hatchbacks and estates or station wagons. There were also two- and four-door sedans featuring separate boots/trunks, which shared the silhouettes of the hatchbacks: in the United Kingdom, the sedan versions were soon withdrawn, until the 1986 launch of the MKII-based Belmont. For the first time since 1965 there was no coupé-bodied Kadett in the range: the previous Kadett C coupé was indirectly replaced by the three-door 1.3 SR sports model.
The decklid badge says it's an automatic, but there's a four-speed manual inside. Was it a decklid or transmission swap? Either way, these cars were very, very cheap; the MSRP on a 1967 Kadett two-door sedan was $1,657 (about $12,500 in 2018 dollars), which compared favorably to the $1,639 Volkswagen Beetle that year. The Kadett had 54 hp to the Beetle's 53 (and weighed 93 fewer pounds than the Volks, to boot), so it was a bit quicker. On top of that, it had a heater that worked, plus a design dated a lot later than the late 1930s. Of course, most American car buyers looking for something economical preferred stripped-down versions of "traditional" American cars, e.g., the Chevy II ($2,090), the AMC Rambler American 220 ($2,073) the Ford Falcon ($2,118), or the Plymouth Valiant ($2,017). The Corvair two-door was $2,128 that year, too, and let's not forget the $1,790 Toyota Corona sedan.
Replacing the orange for radiant tones of red and teal blue everywhere, it was the same in Brazil. I miss those days… at least when the loans got popularity we still could buy funny and long lasting products (Philips included) however today… I’m not surprised the 70’s and 80’s music are still popular as the cars of that time, everything today is carefully made to make us bored.
From the late 1930s to the 1980s, terms from the German Navy (Kapitän, Admiral, Kadett) and from other official sectors (Diplomat, Senator) were often used as model names. Since the late 1980s, the model names of Opel passenger cars end with an a. As Opels were no longer being sold in Great Britain, no need remained to have separate model names for essentially identical Vauxhall and Opel cars (although some exceptions were made to suit the British market). The last series to be renamed across the two companies was the Opel Kadett, being the only Opel to take the name of its Vauxhall counterpart, as Opel Astra. Although only two generations of Astra were built prior to the 1991 model, the new car was referred to across Europe as the Astra F, referring to its Kadett lineage. Until 1993, the Opel Corsa was known as the Vauxhall Nova in Great Britain, as Vauxhall had initially felt that Corsa sounded too much like "coarse", and would not catch on.
We’ll come back to that in a minute, but first – what is a Crossland X and why is it here? It’s actually Opel’s new small crossover, and also a replacement for the old Meriva MPV, and it shares a chassis and some major mechanical bits with the Peugeot 2008 and Citroen C3 Aircross. Ah, so you’ll assume, this must be the first fruits of the much-bandied-about buyout of Opel by the PSA Group that owns Peugeot and Citroen. Well, not quite. The three car brands actually began collaborating on new chassis and engines some time ago, and the forthcoming Grandland X (Opel’s rival for the Nissan Qashqai) will share its chassis with the Peugeot 3008 and the Citroen C5 Aircross.
Launched in 1962, GM Europe's small car for the 1960s, the Opel Kadett, looked like a shrunk Chevy Nova, and hid a 1.0-liter water-cooled overhead-valve four-cylinder up its nose. While this motor had pre-War origins, it was a good one. It weighed just 211 lbs, revved beyond 6000 rpm, and made 54 horsepower in the high-compression 'S' version, as long as you used premium fuel.

Instead, it had the same front fascia as the Latin American Chevrolet Corsa, possibly because GM South Africa wanted the same front fascia as the sedan and pickup, as swapping with the European front fascia would have been expensive sawing and welding due to the Latin American Corsa's sharper headlights. This car was 2001 Semperit Irish Car of the Year in Ireland.


Sistem automatskog kočenja u hitnim situacijama1 prepoznaje pešake i druga vozila koja ste možda prevideli. Pri brzinama između 5 i 85 km/h, sistem konstantno meri razdaljinu do drugih vozila i upozorava vas ako vam prilaze prevelikom brzinom / ako je razdaljina prekratka. Ako ne reagujete, sistem automatski započinje kočenje u slučaju opasnosti i smanjuje brzinu vozila. Pri brzinama ispod 30 km/h, automobil će kočiti do potpunog zaustavljanja.
Styling wise, the Corsa OPC/VXR get more aggressive body kits with new bumpers, aluminium frames for the fog lights, a small scoop in the hood, a big roof spoiler and twin pipe Remus exhaust with a diffuser. Inside, the Recaro performance seats take centre stage, with other upgrades including the flat bottomed leather steering wheel, OPC gear knob and sports pedals along, as well as OPC design instruments.[53]

Rüsselsheim/Veneto.  Crisp and compact on the outside, very spacious and versatile on the inside with trendy two-tone paintwork and cool SUV look – that is the all-new Opel Crossland X. Following its premiere at the beginning of February, this versatile urban crossover model is the second member of the Opel X family in the B-segment where it joins the sporty bestseller, the Mokka X. The third member, the larger Grandland X, will be launched in the compact class (C-segment) later this year. 

German manufacturer Opel and its British sister Vauxhall have committed to no less than eight all-new or refreshed models before 2020, with a focus on growth segments. Of these eight models, three will be all-new versions of the Corsa light hatch, Vivaro van, and the successor to the Mokka X small crossover, the former two scheduled for launch next year, while the latter will hit the European market in 2020...
Rüsselsheim.  In 2019 Opel celebrates 120 years of automobile production – and thereby 120 years full of innovations for everyone. The German brand has a tradition of pioneering high-tech advancements and quickly bringing them to series production. This makes mobility affordable for many and the cars safer, cleaner, more comfortable and more practical. The 120 years advertising campaign, “Opel. Born in Germany. Made for everyone.” is based on this philosophy. It was as true of the first Opel – the Patentmotorwagen “System Lutzmann” of 1899 – as of all the other models that followed, from the “Doktorwagen” to “Laubfrosch” (Tree Frog), P4 and Kadett. Today the philosophy matches the Opel Corsa more than any other model.
The first cars were produced in 1899 after Opel's wife Sophie and their two eldest sons entered into a partnership with Friedrich Lutzmann, a locksmith at the court in Dessau in Saxony-Anhalt, who had been working on automobile designs for some time.[11][12] These cars were not very successful and the partnership was dissolved after two years, following which Opel signed a licensing agreement in 1901 with the French Automobiles Darracq France to manufacture vehicles under the brand name Opel Darracq. These cars consisted of Opel bodies mounted on Darracq chassis, powered by two-cylinder engines.
I bought a 1971 Opel station wagon (new). I drove this car for over 20 years – to work and fishing and hunting trips. I loved it. The odometer was showing right at 250,000 miles when she finally gave up the ghost. Got a 3 inch piece of the rear axle on my computer desk right now…not just for a paper weight, but as a connection to the past, before my hair turned gray.
SRi models get sport style seats and distinctive 16in alloy wheels, while those opting for the SRi VX-Line models get 17in alloys, sports suspension and an aggressive bodykit thrown into the package. The special edition models consists of the Limited, Red and Black Edition Corsas. Limited Edition models get Vauxhall's OnStar concierge and emergency portal, sports seats, air conditioning, chrome exhaust, sports suspension, 17in alloy wheels and front foglights included in the package, while the Red and Black Edition gets a red or black paint job, 17in diamond-cut alloy wheels and are the only Corsas fitted with the 148bhp turbocharged 1.4-litre petrol engine.
A mark of General Motors' confidence in their plans for the small car sector, and something that the Opel Kadett and the Vauxhall Viva had in common, was that the manufacturer built for each new model a completely new car plant in a region characterized by relatively high unemployment and the availability of a skilled workforce, but with no strong tradition of volume auto-making. The Vauxhall Viva was the first car built at Vauxhall's Ellesmere Port plant while the Kadett A was the first product of Opel's new purpose built Bochum plant.[1] Ellesmere Port and Bochum would effectively become sister plants, producing subsequent generations of Kadett as well as their Vauxhall badged sisters (the Chevette and Astra) for the next fifty years.
All figures quoted relate to the EU base model with standard equipment. Fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are determined according to regulations R (EC) No. 715/2007 and R (EC) No. 692/2008, taking into consideration the vehicle weight in running order, as specified. Additional equipment and options may lead to higher results than stated. The figures do not relate to a specific vehicle and are not part of an offer. They are provided only for the purpose of comparison between different vehicles but may differ from the actual fuel consumption and Co2 achieved in real-life driving conditions which are influenced by driving style and operating conditions. Additional equipment may increase the weight of the vehicle when empty and in some cases the permissible axle weights as well as the permissible total weight and reduce the permissible towing weights. This may lead to a reduction in top speed and increased acceleration time. Driving performance figures assume a 75 kg driver plus a 125 kg load. 2 H gas in m3/100 km.

That's distressing, but it's also distressing to see how far along GM and Saab dealers went with that plan. In a June 1990 article from Automotive News, even then-Opel chairman Louis Hughes said "There's quite a difference between the Calibra concept and the traditional Saab concept." That's about as close as any auto exec will get to saying "this car doesn't fit in with the brand, but we're going to badge it anyway." That Auto News story expected the car would be approved to go by the end of 1990, and that they'd be built in the same factory in Finland that turned out special Saabs like the 9-3 Viggen and all of the convertibles.
In 1992 a potent turbocharged four-wheel-drive version joined the range. The 204bhp Calibra had a six-speed gearbox and an independent rear end borrowed from the Omega. Unlike the regular car, this Calibra Turbo struggled to find a following as it was complex and expensive, and the lack of a motorsport pedigree didn't help. The following year saw the introduction of perhaps the most sought after Calibra model. Dropping a 168bhp 2.5 V6 engine into the Calibra made for a refined and highly enjoyable grand tourer, a role that suited the spacious and comfortable car well.
In terms of interior passenger space, the Opel Corsa ranks similarly to most other Economy options, able to seat 5 passengers, though tall passengers sitting in the back seats may have a hard time on long drives, as the cabin's low roof can make the interior feel cramped. On the other hand, Families traveling with small children are especially well-suited for the Corsa.
1938 saw the presentation of the highly successful Kapitän. With a 2.5 L six-cylinder engine, all-steel body, front independent suspension, hydraulic shock absorbers, hot-water heating (with electric blower), and central speedometer. 25,374 Kapitäns left the factory before the intensification of World War II brought automotive manufacturing to a temporary stop in the Autumn of 1940, by order of the government.
Rüsselsheim.  In 2019 Opel celebrates 120 years of automobile production – and thereby 120 years full of innovations for everyone. The German brand has a tradition of pioneering high-tech advancements and quickly bringing them to series production. This makes mobility affordable for many and the cars safer, cleaner, more comfortable and more practical. The 120 years advertising campaign, “Opel. Born in Germany. Made for everyone.” is based on this philosophy. It was as true of the first Opel – the Patentmotorwagen “System Lutzmann” of 1899 – as of all the other models that followed, from the “Doktorwagen” to “Laubfrosch” (Tree Frog), P4 and Kadett. Today the philosophy matches the Opel Corsa more than any other model.
^ General Motors Austria Gesellschaft m.b.H. (GMA, founded 1963 as sales organisation; from 1979: Administration, Non-productive Departments an Sales) and General Motors Austria Werke Gesellschaft m.b.H. (GMAW founded 1979; Production). In November 1987 GMAW (Austrian Handelsregister, HRB 24.436) were merged into GMA (HRB 20.133b, actual Firmenbuch FN 110500a).
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