The manufacturer now offered two versions of the Kadett, designated the "Kadett KJ38 and the "Kadett K38" the latter also being sold as the "Kadett Spezial". Mechanically and in terms of published performance there was little to differentiate the two, but the "Spezial" had a chrome stripe below the window line, and extra external body trim in other areas such as on the front grill. The interior of the "Spezial" was also better equipped. To the extent that the 300 Mark saving for buyers of the car reflected reduced production costs, the major difference was that the more basic "KJ38" lost the synchromous springing with which the car had been launched, and which continued to be fitted on the "Spezial". The base car instead reverted to traditional rigid axle based suspension similar to that fitted on the old Opel P4.
The Kadett A (above) finally appeared in 1962, and was a classic GM/Opel effort: highly pragmatic, conventional in every respect, reasonably stylish for its time, and designed to deliver a good bang for the buck. In just about every way possible, it was the antithesis of the VW: front-engine rwd, a rather tinny but roomy body, highly tossable but with a primitive suspension and ride, a very roomy trunk, and excellent visibility as well as economy. Oh, and a proper heater even! Its little 987 cc OHV four made 40 net/46 gross hp, six more than the VW 1200. Its trim fighting weight of 1475 lbs (670 kg), some two hundred pounds less than the VW, showed in both its acceleration and body integrity.
The German company based in Rüsselsheim, which now belongs to the PSA group, made a profit in 2018 for the first time since 1999. According to Lohscheller, this enabled them to make the necessary investments in electric mobility. Opel intends to electrify its entire product range by 2024. “The smaller vehicles, in particular, are especially suitable for electric propulsion,” said the company boss, who also explained that Opel, also known as Vauxhall, is switching from nine to just two platforms: “One small and one large, which can be used throughout the group. In addition to diesel and gasoline engines, each has an electrified drive system – either purely electric or as a plug-in hybrid.”
The Kadett E was introduced as the Chevrolet Kadett, and its station wagon version was called the Chevrolet Ipanema. The latter had three doors until model year 1993, when five doors became mandatory. The hatchback was only available with three doors, and the sedan was never offered. Brazilian production of the hatchback commenced in April 1989, with the Ipanema being added in October. From 1991 all versions featured fuel injection. Brazilian cars received either 1.8 or 2.0-litre petrol or ethanol fours. The Ipanema was discontinued in 1996, and the Kadett, in 1998.[28]
Launched in 1962, GM Europe's small car for the 1960s, the Opel Kadett, looked like a shrunk Chevy Nova, and hid a 1.0-liter water-cooled overhead-valve four-cylinder up its nose. While this motor had pre-War origins, it was a good one. It weighed just 211 lbs, revved beyond 6000 rpm, and made 54 horsepower in the high-compression 'S' version, as long as you used premium fuel.
A television advert in 1986 featured the Ritchie Valens hit "La Bamba" playing in the background CGI allowed a Nova to drive over vehicles in a busy city. Another advert from 1990 featured a Nova as a pet, CGI allowing it to jump through a traffic jam and briefly play a hotrod whilst stopped at traffic lights. The end featured a homage to Wacky Races, with the Nova laughing like Muttley.[10] This advert featured Angus Deayton.
A special limited volume Last Edition was created as a final chapter in the Calibra story. August 29, 1997 marked the official end of production. Fittingly, it was a black Last Edition with a 2.0-liter, four-valve engine which rolled off the assembly line as the final Calibra to be made. Today, Opel Classic enjoys showing this car at many Youngtimer events.

There were two Opel-franchised assembly plants in Ireland in the 1960s. One in Ringsend, Dublin, was operated by Reg Armstrong Motors, which also assembled NSU cars and motorcycles. The second assembly plant was based in Cork and operated by O'Shea's, which also assembled Škoda cars and Zetor tractors.The models assembled were the Kadett and the Rekord. From 1966, the Admiral was imported as a fully built unit and became a popular seller.
Another unique aspect to Opel nomenclature is its use of the "Caravan" (originally styled as 'Car-A-Van') name to denote its station wagon body configuration, (similar to Volkswagen's Variant or Audi's Avant designations), a practice the company observed for many decades, which finally ceased with the 2008 Insignia and 2009 Astra, where the name "Sports Tourer" is now used for the estate/station wagon versions.
The Latin American Corsa received a small facelift in 1999, with smoother bumpers, and from April 2002 (when the new Corsa II was introduced) the Corsa B began being marketed as the "Corsa Classic"[27] until 2010, where it became the "Classic" when the Corsa B derived Chevrolet Sail and Chevrolet Celta replaced it. Production finally ceased in October 2016.[28]
A special limited volume Last Edition was created as a final chapter in the Calibra story. August 29, 1997 marked the official end of production. Fittingly, it was a black Last Edition with a 2.0-liter, four-valve engine which rolled off the assembly line as the final Calibra to be made. Today, Opel Classic enjoys showing this car at many Youngtimer events.
All of this was a product of corporate leverage and synergies and all of these corporate-sounding words that sound so much better when Jack Donaghy says them. The cynical say that the idea to badge Opels as Saabs happened a few years later with the second-generation 900, which shares a lot of pieces with the Calibra, but in reality they're very different cars. As a Saab, I say the Calibra would've been derided from the start and its reputation ruined that way. Listen to Chris Goffey and his beard go on about its styling and merits when he drove it as the Vauxhall Calibra on old Top Gear.
In 2014, Opel revealed the fifth generation Corsa model, which almost looks like its Adam smaller brother minus the funkiness. The major design changes can be seen especially at the front, where the smiling grille sits more higher, encompassing a chrome ornament and the Opel badge, new headlights and foglights surroundings as well as a new hood. Te side profile is more accentuated by two sharp l...
Furthermore, the KARL ROCKS also caters for customers looking for an alternative fuel offering and is available with the 1.0 LPG ecoFLEX ex works (NEDC LPG consumption: urban 7.1 l/100 km, extra-urban 5.2 l/100 km, combined 5.9 l/100 km; 95 g/km CO2; NEDC fuel consumption: urban 5.8 l/100 km, extra-urban 4.1 l/100 km, combined 4.7 l/100 km; 108 g/km CO2). When ordered in this combination, owners can cover a total distance of 1,019 kilometers (in accordance with NEDC) between visits to the filling station thanks to the 32-liter gasoline and the 20-liter LPG tanks.
The front-wheel drive Opel Corsa was first launched in September 1982. Built in Zaragoza, Spain, the first Corsas were three door hatchback and two door saloon models, with four door and five door versions arriving in 1984. In mainland Europe, the saloon versions were known as the "Corsa TR" until May 1985. The saloons did not sell particularly well in most of Europe but were popular in Spain and Portugal, among other markets.
1 = Optional on SC / SE - late 2017. Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection works automatically at speeds between 5 and 140km/h. For speeds between 5 and 30km/h a 0.9g deceleration is applied to reduce the impact speed of the collision. For speeds of 30 to 140km/h the system reduces the speed by up to 50km/h. To reduce speed by over 50km/h the driver needs to provide additional braking. The operational speed range depends on the type of obstacle detected:
The extra-light, all-aluminium engines, together with optimization of the front and rear axles, also contribute to the low total weight. The particularly compact three-cylinder petrol engines weigh around 15kg less than the previous generation of similarly powerful four-cylinder units. Highly unusual in the small-car-sector is the new Corsa’s aluminium engine bonnet, which although longer, saves 2.4kg in comparison to the previous model’s bonnet made of steel. The Insignia flagship was previously the only model in the Opel range with an aluminium bonnet. The seats also have been put on a diet. The new optimized seat structure saves a total of 10kg – 5.5kg at the front, 4.5kg at the rear. New lighter insulating material was used for fine tuning. Altogether the measures result in a weight reduction that, in combination with optimum aerodynamics and the efficient powertrains, will lead to a considerable reduction in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.
Later, an 1800 cc version wis introduced for the Kadett/Astra GTE model. This range o ingines wis an aa uised for later models o the Corsa/Nova, an the mid-sized Cavalier/Ascona. The Kadett D wis an' a' equipped wi a 1600 cc diesel ingine that wis possible tae drive as cheap as 5.0 L/100 km, an a cairy-ower 1196cc OHV ingine. It wis an aa produced as IDA Kadett in Kikinda, Yugoslavie.

Launched in 1962, GM Europe's small car for the 1960s, the Opel Kadett, looked like a shrunk Chevy Nova, and hid a 1.0-liter water-cooled overhead-valve four-cylinder up its nose. While this motor had pre-War origins, it was a good one. It weighed just 211 lbs, revved beyond 6000 rpm, and made 54 horsepower in the high-compression 'S' version, as long as you used premium fuel.

×