Opel had been Germany's largest auto-producer in the 1930s, and in Wolfsburg the producers of the Kadett's principal target did not disguise their concern at the prospect of Opel's return to small car production. At the Volkswagen annual general meeting a few months before the launch of the Kadett, Volkswagen chairman Heinrich Nordhoff (who himself had been a senior manager with Opel in the 1930s and 1940s) went on record with a warning to shareholders that Opel (along with Ford Germany) were backed by a level of financial muscle on a scale unimaginable to any German company, and that it seemed that the two American transplants were now determined to use their financial strength to make aggressive inroads into the German auto-market at any price.[2]
The instrument panel and center stack are clearly structured and horizontally aligned to the driver. The cluster and air vents feature subtle chrome finishes, conveying a message of high quality, while the available 8-inch color touchscreen is seamless integrated into the centerstack and features modern IntelliLink infotainment system, including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility.
Crisp side lines along with the seemingly ‘floating roof’, which visually separates the lower from the upper section of the vehicle, optically stretch the Crossland X and reinforce its spacious interior. The ‘floating roof’ also displays its relationship to the Opel ADAM’s arched chrome window line that drops towards the rear. Just like for the individualization champion, customers can order a different color for the roof. The prominent rear makes a clear SUV statement with its visible underride protection.

The Kadett D was introduced in the middle of August 1979, with deliveries on the home market beginning early in September 1979.[14] In November 1979, the car went on sale in the United Kingdom, some five months before the Vauxhall Astra Mark 1, the British version, was launched in April 1980. The cars were designed as three- or five-door hatchbacks and estates or station wagons. There were also two- and four-door sedans featuring separate boots/trunks, which shared the silhouettes of the hatchbacks: in the United Kingdom, the sedan versions were soon withdrawn, until the 1986 launch of the MKII-based Belmont. For the first time since 1965 there was no coupé-bodied Kadett in the range: the previous Kadett C coupé was indirectly replaced by the three-door 1.3 SR sports model.
I join in the question: “Where did they all go?” These were pretty common in the upper midwest (as imports went) in the late 60s-mid 70s. I knew a Lutheran minister who owned one (maybe a 69 or so?) in the mid 70s, and got to ride in it once. He seemed pretty proud of the fact that he had put about 80K on it and it seemed to be running strongly. Although it was starting to look a little worn, it seemed to hold up a lot better than my Scoutmaster’s 69 Cortina.
The Kadett B came in 1966 an endit in 1973, wi twa an fower door saloons (the latter in notchback an, frae 1967, an aa in fastback form), a three-door estate, an twa coupés (regular an fastback, or Coupé F). Thare wis a sportin Opel Kadett Rallye, wi a 1.9 L ingine. Additionally, the twa-seat Opel GT wis hivily based on Kadett B components, its body made bi a French contractor, Brissonneau & Lotz. Generally, the Kadett B wis significantly lairger than the Kadett A.
Compared with the Opel Mokka X, which comes with optional four-wheel drive for occasional off-road outings, the new Opel Crossland X is predestined for urban areas with compact exterior dimensions while also being perfectly suitable for a shopping spree at the organic farm shop or for a holiday trip to Tuscany. With a length of 4.21 meters, the new Crossland X is 16 centimeters shorter than an Astra while at the same time 10 centimeters higher. Occupants enjoy an elevated seating position and the excellent all-round view it provides. Buyers looking for an even better experience can further improve the feeling of space with the optional panoramic glass roof.
This range of engines was also used for later models of the Corsa/Nova, and the mid-sized Cavalier/Ascona. From May 1981, the 1.3 was also available with a three-speed automatic. The automatic was made available to the diesel in September 1982. One interesting version which first appeared in mid-1982 was the Kadett Pirsch, (for deer stalking, a stealthy form of hunting). In non-German-speaking countries it was generally marketed as the Kadett Off Road. This was a station wagon with rustic trim, fitted with a differential brake, reinforced suspension and more suitable tires, increased ground clearance, a skid plate, and shortened front fenders.[17] In Sweden, a special postal Kadett ("Opel Kadett Post") was offered, fitted with a high roof (necessitating a unique and much taller windshield) and a sliding right-hand door, RHD, and the automatic transmission.[18] This version was converted by Karosseriefabrik Voll (in German) in Würzburg, Germany. Voll also made a postal version of the Kadett E.
The incarnation of classic car enthusiasm is spelled DeBattista. Joe and his dad Joseph are not just passionate collectors of classic cars but also gifted mechanics who built and restored cars to Concours perfection. Like my 65 Jensen CV-8, which had been painstakingly ground up restored by them in record breaking time. Joe and his dad personally delivered the car from San Francisco to LA a couple of hours before the car entered the Greystone Concours de Elegance in 2014… and won the ‘Best Restoration’ award. Unforgettable moments with Joe and Joseph DeBattista.
The Corsa C was manufactured and sold in South America. The production plant that produced this car model is located in Rosario, Argentina. The Latin American Corsa C featured the Opel inspired Chevrolet logo with a golden bowtie instead of a chromed one – the new logo was first introduced in the South American market with the new Chevrolet Vectra.

Crisp side lines along with the seemingly ‘floating roof’, which visually separates the lower from the upper section of the vehicle, optically stretch the Crossland X and reinforce its spacious interior. The ‘floating roof’ also displays its relationship to the Opel ADAM’s arched chrome window line that drops towards the rear. Just like for the individualization champion, customers can order a different color for the roof. The prominent rear makes a clear SUV statement with its visible underride protection.
Throughout the production run, several special edition models were launched. Customers who chose a Calibra Cliff Motorsport Edition in May 1996 were way ahead of the game. Its paintwork was the same as the Class 1 racing car in which Manuel Reuter would win the ITC championship for Opel at the end of the season. The street-legal Cliff racer had a 20 mm lower sports chassis and BBS light alloy wheels (7J x 16).
It had some crazy mechanical issues. At one point it stumbled and stalled because the carburetor had come loose from the intake manifold and I had to tighten it back down! Another time, my brother was driving it and the brakes failed. Somehow the end of the brake shoe that meets the brake cylinder piston had become worn on one side, causing the piston to slip off the end of the shoe when the brakes were applied, losing braking and squirting fluid all over.
In 1982 Opel once again accomplished a great feat with a small car: the Corsa A joined the range below the Kadett, which by now was becoming a compact model. Designed by Chief Designer Erhard Schnell, who also penned the legendary Opel GT, the only 3.62m-long Corsa was notable for its prominent rally-car wheel arches and a drag coefficient of 0.36. Offered initially as a two-door hatchback and sedan, and a five-door as of 1985, the Corsa again demonstrated how masterfully Opel can generate space on a small platform. The 100hp GSi also combined frugality with fun. Originally conceived as an entry-level model for those on a tight budget, the Corsa A had become a bestseller by 1993 with a total of 3.1 million units sold.
Available as standard-version or 180° panorama, the rear view camera helps you with optimal visibility all round, bird's-eye view and zoom function. What used to be invisible hazards like approaching objects from the side or crossing rear traffic, driving off becomes so much easier and safer. The zoom turns on automatically if objects are closer than 70 centimetres.
This time it was from simply wearing them out, but my 18 year old mother had no idea that tires were something you had to replace. “You don’t have to replace the doors or the wheels or the windshield, why would you have to replace the tires, it’s just part of the car,” she had reasoned. She’s a whip-smart lady but somehow had missed that one. Her father had hilariously taught her how to change a tire (by making her figure it out on the street downtown while everyone they knew drove by and offered to help, as he turned them away one by one while the 5’2″, 90 lb teenager did it herself) but I guess kids think they know everything.
In response to the pressing need for new trucks in a Germany struggling to rebuild, the American authorities governing Rüsselsheim granted permission to the plant to produce a 1.5-short-ton (1.4 t) truck powered by the 2.5 L Kapitän engine. It was a minor miracle that even this was possible. By January 1946, the plant was ready to build trucks, but many of the almost 12,000 parts needed to make each one was lacking. Before the big firms could begin, the small ones had to get started, too. Illness and poor nutrition so crippled the staff of 6,000 workers that it was normal for 500 to be too sick to come to work and more than 400 to report sick during the day.

Rüsselsheim.  In 2019 Opel celebrates 120 years of automobile production – and thereby 120 years full of innovations for everyone. The German brand has a tradition of pioneering high-tech advancements and quickly bringing them to series production. This makes mobility affordable for many and the cars safer, cleaner, more comfortable and more practical. The 120 years advertising campaign, “Opel. Born in Germany. Made for everyone.” is based on this philosophy. It was as true of the first Opel – the Patentmotorwagen “System Lutzmann” of 1899 – as of all the other models that followed, from the “Doktorwagen” to “Laubfrosch” (Tree Frog), P4 and Kadett. Today the philosophy matches the Opel Corsa more than any other model.
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