Opel released in 2010 a minor facelift for the Corsa range which comprised only technical updates and exterior or interior modifications. The German manufacturer however claimed that it also applied a bunch of improvements over the car's chassis, enhancing comfort and ride quality. Each engine underwent an upgrade to become more fuel efficient and to produce less emissions, regardless if we...
The Kadett A (above) finally appeared in 1962, and was a classic GM/Opel effort: highly pragmatic, conventional in every respect, reasonably stylish for its time, and designed to deliver a good bang for the buck. In just about every way possible, it was the antithesis of the VW: front-engine rwd, a rather tinny but roomy body, highly tossable but with a primitive suspension and ride, a very roomy trunk, and excellent visibility as well as economy. Oh, and a proper heater even! Its little 987 cc OHV four made 40 net/46 gross hp, six more than the VW 1200. Its trim fighting weight of 1475 lbs (670 kg), some two hundred pounds less than the VW, showed in both its acceleration and body integrity.
Power was initially from 2.0 L 8-valve (115 bhp) and 16-valve fuel-injected (156 bhp) four-cylinder engines. In 1992 a turbocharged 2.0 L engine (204 bhp) (a turbocharged version of the X20XE) was added to the range. With four-wheel drive, a six-speed Getrag manual transmission and a claimed top speed of 240 km/h (150 mph), this flagship model finally gave the Calibra the dynamics to match its looks.
Faced with an ever-evolving Alfa Romeo and a regrouped Mercedes-Benz, the company was simply lagging behind for the second time during their short DTM career. It was clear something drastic had to happen to bring the car up to speed. With Joest and Cosworth sharpening their swords for a definitive strike, 1995 would have to be Opel’s breakthrough once and for all.

Last week when I was looking at 90s coupes, I came across one that Americans never had the chance to get – the Opel Calibra. A successor to the Opel Manta that Americans once got through Buick dealerships, I began to realize it was a shame we never got to have this. Weirder, considering it shares a lot of underneath pieces with the second-generation Saab 900.


Sloan suggested that GM take the helm of Opel again for a two-year "probationary" period to see whether the economic conditions, then called "close to stagnation" in Germany, would improve. Sloan set other important goals: "General Motors should risk no additional capital in Opel. Credit facilities should be available. We should have complete freedom in personnel policies and administration. The products produced by Adam Opel AG should be solely within the jurisdiction of management, and if prices had to be approved by government authority, a reasonable return on the capital should be allowed."
The Opel Eye front camera processes diverse data, thus forming the basis for the driver assistance systems such as Speed Sign Recognition and Lane Departure Warning. If the system registers that the lane is being left unintentionally it warns the driver by emitting audible and visible signals. Cruise control with speed limiter also makes driving more pleasant. Forward collision alert with pedestrian detection and Automatic Emergency Braking helps avoid accidents, and it is combined with a special Driver Drowsiness Alert.
On 29 February 2012, Opel announced the creation of a major alliance with PSA Peugeot Citroen resulting in GM taking a 7% share of PSA, becoming PSA's second-largest shareholder after the Peugeot family. The alliance was intended to enable $2 billion per year of cost savings through platform sharing, common purchasing, and other economies of scale.[25] In December 2013, GM sold its 7% interest in PSA for £250 million, after plans of cost savings were not as successful.[26] Opel was said to be among Europe's most aggressive discounters in mass-market.[27] GM reported a 2016 loss of US$257 million from its European operations.[26] It is reported that GM has lost about US$20 billion in Europe since 1999.[28]

Efter the war, Opel production facilities frae Rüsselsheim (caurs) an Brandenburg an der Havel (trucks) wur cratit up an transportit tae the Soviet Union as pairt o a lairger reparations package agreed upon bi the victorious pouers. Frae 1948 the prewar Kadett wis manufactured as the Moskvitch 400/420: it continued tae be produced on the edge o Moscow as a Moskvitch till 1956.

In the front, the Crossland X features a prominent grille with a shining Opel Blitz logo that is embraced by two chrome winglets and flow outwards to the ‘double-wing’ Opel signature LED daytime running lights. The horizontal lines from the Opel logo in the middle to the chrome winglets and the chrome bars following through to Adaptive Forward Lighting (AFL) LED headlights create the illusion of extra width.
*The fuel consumption and CO2 emission figures mentioned are determined according to the NEDC homologation regulations (R (EC) No. 715/2007 and R (EC) No. 692/2008, in the versions respectively applicable), which allows comparability with other vehicles. From 01/09/2017 the fuel consumption and CO2 emission values of certain new vehicles are determined using the new worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP), and the relevant values are translated back into NEDC to allow the comparability. Please contact your dealer for the latest information and to check if the values have changed.
Datorită poziției înalte de ședere, Crossland X oferă mai mult decât o vizibilitate mai bună. Datorită scaunelor sale ergonomice speciale (certificate de „Campania pentru un spate sănătos”), Crossland asigură o postură sănătoasă în timpul conducerii. Un autovehicul adaptat nevoilor tale, confortabil pentru toți ocupanții datorită pernelor, spătarelor și tetierelor reglabile.
Production started on December 4, 1946. The Moskvitch 400/420 continued to be made in Moscow with some minor changes until 1956, when it was replaced by the Moskvitch 402. The latter was an all-new design apart from the engine, for which Moskvitch continued to use the Kadett side-valve engine until 1958, when it was replaced with a domestically designed OHV engine.[7]
Instead, it had the same front fascia as the Latin American Chevrolet Corsa, possibly because GM South Africa wanted the same front fascia as the sedan and pickup, as swapping with the European front fascia would have been expensive sawing and welding due to the Latin American Corsa's sharper headlights. This car was 2001 Semperit Irish Car of the Year in Ireland.
Rüsselsheim.  The sixth-generation Opel Corsa is based on a completely new design, which is the basis for an increase in efficiency. The Corsa will celebrate its premiere before the end of this year. Whether diesel, petrol or – for the first time – electrically powered, every new Corsa benefits from the lower weight: the driving dynamics improve, the fuel consumption falls. The lightest version of the next generation even undercuts the magical 1,000-kilogramme mark – excluding driver, the five-door will weigh only 980kg. Compared with its predecessor, this model variant is a useful 108kg lighter. This is a weight-saving of around 10 per cent, although the new model has a similar length of 4.06 metres. Reducing so much weight while retaining similar dimensions is a remarkable development achievement that directly benefits the customer.
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The front-wheel drive Opel Corsa was first launched in September 1982. Built in Zaragoza, Spain, the first Corsas were three door hatchback and two door saloon models, with four door and five door versions arriving in 1984. In mainland Europe, the saloon versions were known as the "Corsa TR" until May 1985. The saloons did not sell particularly well in most of Europe but were popular in Spain and Portugal, among other markets.
In 1994 a 167 hp 2.5 L V6 was introduced, thus creating what many considered to be the finest Calibra to date. Available with both manual and automatic transmissions, the V6 wasn’t as fast as the Turbo, but was rather more civilised, and proved to be more reliable than the complex four-wheel drive model with its notorious transfer box issues. 1995 saw the introduction of the the X20XEV Ecotec engine, a cheaper, less reliable derivative of the classic X20XE 16-valve or "red top" engine. This marked a reduction in power from 156 bhp to 136 bhp for the 16-valve version, although the Turbo continued with the C20LET.
Replacing the orange for radiant tones of red and teal blue everywhere, it was the same in Brazil. I miss those days… at least when the loans got popularity we still could buy funny and long lasting products (Philips included) however today… I’m not surprised the 70’s and 80’s music are still popular as the cars of that time, everything today is carefully made to make us bored.
All Mexican previous versions were known as the Chevy, with the names Monza used on the saloon, and Swing (five-door) and Joy (three-door) for the hatchbacks, all with a 1.6-liter 78 PS (57 kW) four-cylinder. There was also a low-end three-door model called the Chevy Popular, which was equipped with a 52 PS (38 kW) 1.4-liter engine.[31] The latter 2004 and 2008 redesigns were simply named Chevy and Chevy Sedán. The Chevy was a favourite among taxicab drivers and one of the best selling cars in the country.
One of the most versatile small German military vehicles, the Kettenkrad, a blend of a tractor and a motorcycle, was powered with a 1.4 L Olympia four-cylinder engine. Produced by NSU, it had motorcycle-type front-wheel steering for gentle turns and negotiated tight corners with brakes on the propelling caterpillar tracks. The Kettenkrad towed antitank guns and transported troops and signal gear in several theatres of war. NSU continued to make it after the war for use in mines and forests. It was one of the few vehicles that could do jobs formerly performed by horses for which, owing to the shortage of oats, even less fuel was available than for motor vehicles.
Both the Opel Karl and its Vauxhall Viva twin will be built alongside the new Spark in South Korea. Looking at the Opel’s measurements, we can see that the new 2016 Chevrolet Spark’s footprint will grow ever so slightly, with a 0.4-inch longer wheelbase and a 0.2-inch longer overall length. The new car’s roof is 3 inch lower overall, and the car could also weigh around 200 lb less than today’s model if the Karl’s 2070 lb curb weight is indicative of the U.S.-spec 2016 Spark’s specification.
However, Opel Team Joest was in for a tough fight. Not only had Alfa Romeo not been sitting on their hands, Mercedes-Benz had finally found the time to build a proper Class 1 car. Although the C180 V6 DTM lacked four wheel drive and only produced 400 horsepower, it featured a 6-speed sequential transmission, F1-derived active suspension, an innovative active ballast system which counteracted the pitching and diving of the nose under acceleration and braking and an all-carbon bodyshell bringing weight down to 980 kg (2161 lbs).
The Kadett did seem to be all over in the late 60’s early 70’s time frame, but rapidly dissappeared from the scene by the end of the 70’s. Bay Buick-GMC in Torrance CA. had an Opel sign for many years, at least until the mid-90’s. Maybe they thought Opel was coming back. Back in the early 70’s I remember a family that had a light metallic green Kadett wagon. I though it was cool for no other reason than it was a 2 door wagon.
Overcoming these and other obstacles, Opel finally celebrated the completion of the first postwar Opel Blitz truck on 15 July 1946 in the presence of United States Army General Geoffrey Keyes and other local leaders and press reporters.[17] Priced at 6600RM, the truck was designed to run either on gasoline or on wood gas, for which a gas generator could be supplied. With a ceremonial bouquet of flowers flying from its rear-view mirror, this historic Opel Blitz left the factory gate bound for a buyer in Wiesbaden on 26 July. Further production followed at a rate of 150 a month, and by the end of 1946, the production total was 839. Frigidaire refrigerators were also being made at Rüsselsheim, as were Olympia engines for the NSU Kettenkrad.
The Corsa C arrived in the 2002 model year as a five door hatchback, and was imported from Europe; but for the model year of 2003, the Corsa sold in Mexico began coming from Brazil and a saloon version was added. In 2005, the saloon version introduced a semi-automatic transmission called easytronic because it was only offered in a five speed manual transmission, however, the easytronic transmission was rapidly discontinued after the model year of 2007, because of poor sales and technical flaws.[citation needed]
Styling was kept very close to that of the 2000 released model with just the face having been altered through the introduction of a chrome horizontal beam that encompassed the Opel logo. Headlight shapes remained unchanged while the bottom part of the front-end panel was diagonally cut at the sides, somewhat mimicking the lines of the V-shaped bonnet. Engine range remained virtually the same wit...
The Kadett C was introduced in Brazil as the Chevrolet Chevette. The three-door station wagon was called the Chevrolet Marajó, and a pick-up was named Chevy 500. Brazilian production commenced in 1973, with the Marajó being added in 1980 and the Chevy 500 in 1983, shortly after a significant facelift affected the entire line. Brazilian cars had engines in various combinations of size - 1.0 (1992-1993), 1.4 (1973-1982), or 1.6 (1982-1995) liters - and fuels (gasoline or ethanol), though not all combinations were available for all body configurations. The last Marajó was built in 1989, the last Chevette in 1993, and the last Chevy 500 in 1995.[27]
My father, who could well be this man  (except for the Germanic house behind it), bought a new sickly-green Kadett A just like this in 1965, at the local Buick dealer in Towson. So, yes; I can speak for the Kadett’s ability to trounce all VWs in street-light races, thanks to my older brother’s repeated VW-baiting. And at seventy or so, the turbulence from the boxy body caused the tops of the thin little doors to actually move away from the body enough to see daylight between them. Lightweight construction indeed.  Hopefully, someday I’ll miraculously find a Kadett A and do the full story of its colorful place in history, both the automotive world’s as well as the Niedermeyer’s. But this CC is about its successor.
Our family car when I turned 16 was the exact same “sickly green” 1965 Kadett A model your father had. My brother and I lived with our divorced mom and she bought it in 1969 from a friend who was leaving the Berkeley, California area where we lived. My mom got a driver’s license with a borrowed car with automatic transmission, but we had no car. So she bought it and figured she would learn to drive a stick, which she never did.
like the dealerships advertised,a stock vr ss 5.0 v8 will smoke it,does the 0-100k sprint in 6.0 seconds flat(standard engine+ecu parameters),oddly enough the dealerships rated the v8 as a 7 sec 0-100k car,it was over 22k au cheaper than the calibra,back in 95,obviously a marketing conn from the dealerships,thats not to say that the calibra can turn into a real beast with a phase 1-2-3 kit,
The Kadett A (above) finally appeared in 1962, and was a classic GM/Opel effort: highly pragmatic, conventional in every respect, reasonably stylish for its time, and designed to deliver a good bang for the buck. In just about every way possible, it was the antithesis of the VW: front-engine rwd, a rather tinny but roomy body, highly tossable but with a primitive suspension and ride, a very roomy trunk, and excellent visibility as well as economy. Oh, and a proper heater even! Its little 987 cc OHV four made 40 net/46 gross hp, six more than the VW 1200. Its trim fighting weight of 1475 lbs (670 kg), some two hundred pounds less than the VW, showed in both its acceleration and body integrity.
The Kadett’s role in facilitating that is a major piece of automotive history I’ve been wanting to tell for years, but finding a Kadett in this country has been impossible, despite Opel having dumped almost half a million on our shores. It took my son’s recent trip to the old country to find one, sitting on the street in Innsbruck, no less. Maybe folks back there have a greater appreciation for Kadetts and the role they played; Americans’ fling with the Kadett was a very fleeting one, and perhaps many would just as soon forget it. Not me.
Despite its age, the Opel/Vauxhall Corsa was ranked #10 in Europe's best-selling cars top last year. An all-new model is right around the corner and it should help the supermini put up a good fight against other subcompact hatchbacks like the next-gen Renault Clio and Peugeot 208. Today, Opel is releasing some technical details about its revamped five-door-only city car, emphasizing on the diet it’ll be going through for its sixth iteration.
The handling and ride are basically fine, but are all but invisible from the point of view of a keen driver. The Crossland is tidy through corners, with reasonable steering weight but no actual feedback, and the body tilts over only to a reasonable angle. The ride is a touch stiff in its damping, especially around town (which is disappointing, given that any Crossland will probably spend most of its life in town) but it does improve on the open road. Refinement is only average though with quite a bit of wind and road noise. There’s little point in having Opel’s phone-based OnStar concierge service fitted if you can’t hear what the operator is saying . . .
While at the AVUS-ring, John Winter suffered a horrendous accident after being nudged by one of the Mercedes on the opening lap. He was pitched into a high-speed half-spin to the right, and hit the barriers with enough force to rupture the fuel tank. A gigantic fireball erupted from the destroyed car, but Winter was able to crawl out relatively unscathed. With only minor burns to his face, he was lucky to be alive.
*The fuel consumption and CO2 emission figures mentioned are determined according to the NEDC homologation regulations (R (EC) No. 715/2007 and R (EC) No. 692/2008, in the versions respectively applicable), which allows comparability with other vehicles. From 01/09/2017 the fuel consumption and CO2 emission values of certain new vehicles are determined using the new worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP), and the relevant values are translated back into NEDC to allow the comparability. Please contact your dealer for the latest information and to check if the values have changed.

In response to the pressing need for new trucks in a Germany struggling to rebuild, the American authorities governing Rüsselsheim granted permission to the plant to produce a 1.5-short-ton (1.4 t) truck powered by the 2.5 L Kapitän engine. It was a minor miracle that even this was possible. By January 1946, the plant was ready to build trucks, but many of the almost 12,000 parts needed to make each one was lacking. Before the big firms could begin, the small ones had to get started, too. Illness and poor nutrition so crippled the staff of 6,000 workers that it was normal for 500 to be too sick to come to work and more than 400 to report sick during the day.
Factory involvement from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Rover, Ford, Opel and finally Audi propelled the DTM into the public eye. With cars strongly resembling the ones parked down virtually every street, the series managed to gain traction among the average car buyer. Nowhere else could you see your uncle’s boring Rover take on your dad’s humble Ford in a ferocious battle to the finish line. With contact a frequent occurrence, the spectacle was complete.
Under the stubby bonnet, Opel has borrowed engines as well as chassis from PSA, so the EcoTec 1.6-litre diesel is actually the French 1.6-litre BlueHDI engine wearing lederhosen and a false moustache. It’s a very good engine, in fairness. Not as refined, overall, as Opel’s home-grown 1.6, nor as powerful (120hp plays 136hp) but quieter at low rpm when cold, and with very good economy. Sadly, the six-speed manual gearbox is also brought in from France and its sloppy, loose-limbed action does not bespeak of German precision. The engine, to be honest, doesn’t seem to suit the car, surging and growling with rather too much enthusiasm and basically making a nuisance of itself. I suspect the Crossland would be better-suited to the revvy, lightweight 1.2-litre petrol engine.
We took the ferry from Newhaven to Dieppe and then headed down to Forges-les-Eaux, along winding D-roads through quiet villages and dense forests, scenes to be repeated over the following three days. What you notice immediately about the Calibra is how civilised it is. That V6 engine is a gem, not especially powerful by today’s standards but honestly quick and genuinely refined.

Not only was the body a bit bigger, but the Kadett B also had a slightly enlarged 1100 cc engine. This was externally a very compact motor indeed, and looked rather lost in the Kadett’s Kavernous engine bay. Power output increased correspondingly; there were 45 and 55 DIN hp (high compression) versions for Europe; the weaker on was sent stateside with a 54 (gross) hp rating.
According to the car's manufacturer's data, the Karl needs 4,9 l of LPG per 100 km of highway driving, 7,1 l/100 km in the city and 5,7 l/100 km on average. Just for comparion, when running on petrol it requires on average 4,6 l/100 km, but don't be fooled by the sheer figures since autogas is usually by approx. 50 percent cheaper than its conventional counterpart. Given the fuel economy figures and current fuel prices, the only kind of motor vehicle cheaper to run than a Karl LPGTEC would probably be... a moped. As for CO2 emissions, the autogas-powered pocket-sized Opel spews out 93 g/km, which is less than the special ECO version running on petrol, which emits 99 g/km.

In addition to its West German home market, the Kadett A sold strongly in what were becoming the manufacturer's traditional export strongholds (notably in Benelux, Scandinavia, Austria and Switzerland). Between February 1964 and the Autumn/Fall of 1965 the cars were also exported to the United States where they were sold through approximately 500 Buick dealers. The same 993 cc engine was fitted and it is not clear whether it was differently tuned for North America: horsepower ratings were differently computed in the USA, following locally devised "SAE" rules: for American market purposes the maximum outputs for the engines were quoted as 46 hp (34 kW; 47 PS) and 54 hp (40 kW; 55 PS).

That makes it a similar size and weight to the outgoing Corsa, at a whiff over four metres long and 1177kg. Beyond that, new means new. Every panel on the mildly Adam-ised, slightly more butch exterior is different. Every component forward of the A-pillars is new. Every suspension component, too, as are the pick-up points for the front MacPherson struts and the rear torsion beam.
Available as standard-version or 180° panorama, the rear view camera helps you with optimal visibility all round, bird's-eye view and zoom function. What used to be invisible hazards like approaching objects from the side or crossing rear traffic, driving off becomes so much easier and safer. The zoom turns on automatically if objects are closer than 70 centimetres.
The Kadett E (Vauxhall Astra Mark 2 in the UK) wis introduced in 1984, an wis votit 1985 European Caur o the Year, lairgely due tae its advanced aerodynamic body stylin. The 1984 model wis an aa developt intae a mair conventional three-box design wi a buit (trunk), badged as the Vauxhall Belmont in the UK an the Opel Monza in Sooth Africae, launcht in Januar 1986. This wis awardit 1985 Semperit Erse Caur o the Year in Ireland.

The last known KF V6 Calibra race car in existence, is the Zakspeed prototype, Calibra Concept 2, which had been built to be used as a test car for the upcoming FIA championship, that actually never happened. The Calibra turbo was also rallied, albeit without any major successes. A Calibra finished ninth in the 1992 Sanremo Rallye, with Bruno Thiry at the wheel. This did make it the fastest car in the 1600 to 2000 cc class.[10]

Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection works automatically at speeds between 5 and 140km/h. For speeds between 5 and 30km/h a 0.9g deceleration is applied to reduce the impact speed of the collision. For speeds of 30 to 140km/h the system reduces the speed by up to 50km/h. To reduce speed by over 50km/h the driver needs to provide additional braking. The operational speed range depends on the type of obstacle detected: 
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