Unfortunately, Opel’s first victory in the DTM turned out to be as much of a fluke as the podium at Hockenheim. The Calibra’s fell behind once more, and resorted to occupying the lower end of the top 10. The airfield circuit at Diepholz, a third visit to the Nurburgring and the high-speed section of autobahn known as the AVUS-ring were all without meaningful results.
The suspension and brakes got some serious attention too, and the Rally 1900 was quite the sensation in its brief heyday, and garnered a very positive review by Car and Driver. (see related story on C/D’s Opel Kadett assassination story). Until the Ascona/Opel 1900 (CC here) came along in about 1971, the Rally carried a bright flame for Opel. The Ascona had been planned as a replacement for the Kadett, but when Ford launched their very bare-bones Escort, Opel kept the Kadett on, although at least in the US, it reverted to a very basic trim level and only with the 1100 cc motor, and sales swooned, due to rising prices as a result of the falling dollar.
However, Opel Team Joest was in for a tough fight. Not only had Alfa Romeo not been sitting on their hands, Mercedes-Benz had finally found the time to build a proper Class 1 car. Although the C180 V6 DTM lacked four wheel drive and only produced 400 horsepower, it featured a 6-speed sequential transmission, F1-derived active suspension, an innovative active ballast system which counteracted the pitching and diving of the nose under acceleration and braking and an all-carbon bodyshell bringing weight down to 980 kg (2161 lbs).
What I love about this series of videos is their diversity. According to the literature, this Kadett was produced for three years, so obtaining parts for the restoration must have been very challenging. Production of the 1 liter, OHV, I4 engine starts with this car, and continues for 30 years, with minor variations. From the beginning the engine had advanced features for the period such as aluminum pistons; a hydraulically tensioned, chain driven cam shaft; hollow push rods; and an aluminum intake manifold. The fact that this engine has never been apart says a thing or two about their longevity.
Opel traces its roots to a sewing machine manufacturer founded by Adam Opel in 1862 in Rüsselsheim am Main. The company began manufacturing bicycles in 1886 and produced its first automobile in 1899. After listing on the stock market in 1929, General Motors took a majority stake in Opel and then full control in 1931, establishing the American reign over the German automaker for nearly 90 years.[1]
Bold, crisp and cool are the three attributes that every “urban crossover” needs. The new Crossland X has them all while remaining a typical Opel with best possible packaging and a huge personality. With its length of 4,212 millimeters, width of 1,765 millimeters and height of 1,605 millimeters, it brings its very own interpretation of Opel’s design philosophy ‘Sculptural Artistry meets German Precision’ to the table and makes it both sophisticated and rugged, with the prominent grille and shining Opel Blitz leading the way. SUV-typical claddings and silver inserts in the front and throughout the entire lower section of the vehicle support the confident appearance and display functional and sporty elegance.
Rüsselsheim.  Opel will this year launch the sixth generation of the Corsa. Starting with the first model in 1982, the Corsa has now recorded sales of more than 13.5 million units. The next generation will bring a revolution in lighting to small cars: the multiple award-winning IntelliLux LED® matrix lighting technology. The newly developed Corsa will feature for the first time the adaptive, glare-free full-LED headlight system that has impressed experts and customers since its introduction on the current Opel Astra (European Car Of The Year 2016). Following their arrival in the compact class, matrix headlights (which are usually found only on expensive premium cars) will therefore appear for the first time in the very popular mainstream B market segment – the biggest in Europe. Another demonstration of the democratisation of technology from Opel – the exciting, approachable, German brand.
Frânarea automată de urgență¹ detectează pietonii și alte autovehicule pe care este posibil ca tu să nu le fi văzut. La viteze între 5 și 85 km/h, sistemul măsoară continuu distanța până la alte autovehicule și te avertizează dacă se apropie prea rapid/sunt prea aproape. Dacă nu reacționezi, sistemul activează automat frânarea de urgență, reducând viteza autovehiculului. Pentru viteze sub 30 km/h, autovehiculul va frâna până la oprire.
However, KARL ROCKS has much more to offer than its enticing looks and stylish interior – it is also just as practical as the Opel KARL. Four doors guarantee easy access to the front and rear seats while the five seats ensure that even families can enjoy Opel’s SUV-inspired mini car. And when needed, the rear seats, with a 40/60 split as standard, can be folded down completely giving the KARL ROCKS an impressive total trunk space of exactly 1,013 liters.

For 1937 the Kadett was offered as a small and unpretentious[1] two door "Limousine" (sedan/saloon) or, at the same list price of 2,100 Marks, as a soft top "Cabrio-Limousine". The body resembled that of the existing larger Opel Olympia and its silhouette reflected the "streamlining" tendencies of the time. The 1,074cc side-valve engine came from the 1935 Opel P4 and came with the same listed maximum power output of 23 PS (17 kW; 23 hp) at 3,400 rpm.[2]

The new four-cylinder, oversquare one-litre water-cooled Opel OHV engine weighed only 96 kg and was the first all-new engine developed by Opel since before the war. The side-mounted camshaft was driven not through gear-cogs but using a single chain with a hydraulic tensioner, the valve train employing rocker-arms and light-weight hollow rods. The arrangement was low on weight and on friction, permitting engine speeds above 6,000 rpm. The pistons were formed from an aluminium-alloy and incorporated a bimetal expansion strip to ensure uniform thermal expansion. The three-bearing forged crankshaft was of more traditional construction. The carefully designed aluminium inlet manifold provided for efficient feed of the fuel-mixture to the cylinders and helped provide the engine with good fuel economy characteristics.


One of the most versatile small German military vehicles, the Kettenkrad, a blend of a tractor and a motorcycle, was powered with a 1.4 L Olympia four-cylinder engine. Produced by NSU, it had motorcycle-type front-wheel steering for gentle turns and negotiated tight corners with brakes on the propelling caterpillar tracks. The Kettenkrad towed antitank guns and transported troops and signal gear in several theatres of war. NSU continued to make it after the war for use in mines and forests. It was one of the few vehicles that could do jobs formerly performed by horses for which, owing to the shortage of oats, even less fuel was available than for motor vehicles.
While the Ipanema clearly succeeded the Marajó, production of the Chevette (by now in sedan form only, the hatchback having been discontinued after the 1987 model year) and of the Kadett noticeably overlapped; the newer model was placed above the old one in Chevrolet's lineup. While Chevrolet entertained the possibility of a pick-up version of the Kadett E, it never materialized.
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